the rock n rock of the adf posting cycles with tash herrmann

Axons Unleashed E26: The Rock 'n' Roll of the ADF Posting Cycles - with Tash Herrman

Welcome to another great episode of Axons Unleashed with special guest Tash Herrmann. 

Sometimes in order to truly commit to a career in the ADF a young family has to embrace the posting cycle that comes with it.

Tash Herrmann is a military spouse of almost 30 years who with her husband, Kent, relocated 17 times before finally settling in their dream home this year (built with Axon!).

Tash joins Robbie, Dan and Jane on Axons Unleashed to share her incredible story of life as a young family following the postings of Kent during his rise to Warrant Officer Class 1. Everyone in the ADF will relate to many parts of this podcast.

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Episode Transcription:

Speaker 1:
Axons Unleashed.

Robbie :
Good day everyone. My name’s Robbie. I’m here with Dan, I’m here with Jane, and we’ve got a very special guest with us today, the amazing Tash Herrmann. Hello.

Tash Herrmann:
Hello.

Jane:
Hey, Tash.

Robbie :
Good day, good day. Good to see you.

Jane:
Thanks for coming.

Dan:
Some of you may recognise Tash from every fortnight on our Facebook Live, where she comes along. And her and her lovely other half, Kent, are probably the first and the second people normally to jump online and say good day.

Robbie :
They’re certainly battling everyone else, and sometimes I feel like you guys are battling yourself to see who can jump on first and go, “Hi guys.”

Jane:
They’re what we call super fans.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, it used to just be Kent got on and he wouldn’t let me comment on his account. So, I use my iPhone on the sideline. Watch it on the TV.

Robbie:
I was going to say, you guys have sent me an image before, like you got a big 75 inch TV, like my mullets on there. I’m like, “Oh, just turn… No. I’m sorry you guys are getting to see me so big.”

Dan:
So, what do you do? So, you get set up nice and early on a Wednesday night and go, “All right-

Robbie:
Starts at lunchtime on Wednesday.

Dan:
… Axon’s going live. And we put it up on the big screen TV.”

Jane:
Kent has an alarm on his phone. The alarm goes off and he hooks up the laptop to the TV. I have to have dinner cooked in time, so that he’s not having to eat-

Dan:
So, there’s a whole preparation ready for this evening, is it?

Jane:
I’m glad it’s gone fortnightly. It’s a lot pressure on a Wednesday night.

Dan:
It allows you to relax a little bit.

Robbie:
So are we.

Dan:
Well, it pretty much coincided with when you guys actually moved into your new home, because we were like, “Oh, well, Kent and Tash needs to have some time to be able to unpack. And let’s give them an extra a Wednesday night every two weeks.”

Tash Herrmann:
Thank you for that.

Robbie :
So, we’ve got heaps of awesome stuff to discuss today. So, Tash is going to talk about what it’s like being a military spouse to the tune of the 30 odd years that Kent’s done in the military now.

Tash Herrmann:
About 27 years.

Robbie :
Yeah, close. 27 is 30 odd in my… I know you were a school teacher as well.

Tash Herrmann:
Sorry.

Robbie:
So you’re being very exact there.

Dan:
And that’ll be good. There’ll no doubt be some absolute gems there for some of our listeners who are a military spouse, or indeed if you’re the military member, this would be great to be able to get inside your head of your spouse as well, to be able to learn what they’re thinking, feeling and experiencing from another angle.

Robbie:
As we sat down at breakfast, Dan and I are like, “Well, we can’t tell you what it’s like to be a military spouse.” And Jane, unfortunately, you don’t know what it’s like either.

Jane:
I can’t either.

Robbie:
I mean you probably feel like you’re one anyway, you’ve been the work wife of Dan and I for the last three and a half years.

Jane:
I am. It does get a bit that way.

Robbie:
So, we’re going to talk about that stuff. We’ll talk about your property journey as well, because I know you guys have been successful from building your portfolio, growing your wealth, moving in your own brand new home. Where to from here? You guys are mid to late forties?

Tash Herrmann:
Yep.

Robbie :
Can I group you together in that conversation? Ish?

Tash Herrmann:
Yep.

Robbie :
Normally I’ll say to Dan, I’m like, “It’s about our age,” and he’s like, “Don’t fucking group me together in your age. I’m not in your age, mate. No.”

Dan:
Even though the noggin’s thinning, you have got well and truly advanced years on me.

Tash Herrmann:
Definitely, I’m the same age as you Robbie.

Dan:
Good. I thought you were going to drag… I was like, “Tash, where are you going with this?”

Robbie:
“Tash, come on. Hey, hey, hey.” I know that people are listening on a podcast, they can’t see, but for those watching us on YouTube, they can see. They’re like, “Yes, Robbie, that’s correct.” And of course we’ve got-

Tash Herrmann:
Just be very careful where you go with this right now.

Robbie:
Hey, this is my podcast. I can say whatever I want. And of course we’ve got Jane here with us as well. So, you’ve basically been involved in building a couple of houses now for Kent and Tash.

Jane:
I have.

Robbie :
So, it’ll give everyone a real-time insight into what your experience was like that as well.

Jane:
Sure.

Robbie:
So, start us off Dan.

Dan:
Yeah, absolutely. I mean it was really important for us to make sure we had Jane here during this session as well, because you guys actually share a very unique relationship, I suppose, Jane, having taken you through. And it’s no longer really a professional relationship, although there’s that element there, but you kind of become part of the framework and part of the family in the true sense, Tash, from that perspective.

Tash Herrmann:
Definitely.

Dan:
So, let’s backpedal 30 odd years and let’s go back and talk about Tash. Where does the story of Tash start? Where did you grow up? What was childhood like for you as well?

Tash Herrmann:
So, I grew up in Albury–Wodonga, a big family in Albury–Wodonga.

Jane:
How big?

Tash Herrmann:
My mom is from a family of around 13.

Dan:
Around 13.

Jane:
Give or take.

Robbie:
Has there been something happened? Like normally it’s a bit more of a precise number than that.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes. There’s been-

Robbie:
Around 13.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah…

Robbie:
Okay, fair enough.

Tash Herrmann:
There’s been a couple of passing.

Robbie:
I get it.

Dan:
But there was 13.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, there was 13. So, it’s a big family and Albury–Wodonga is a pretty big military town. Didn’t have anything to do with anyone in the military, although my dad was a Vietnam vet. But of course, as a Vietnam vet and as a Nasho, he didn’t-

Dan:
Mouth shut.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, didn’t talk about it. Really didn’t acknowledge it probably until my sister and I were in our teens. That’s when the Welcome Home parade happened. So, we didn’t really have anything to do with Defence at all, but we lived in a big military town.

Dan:
How did that, I suppose, affect you? Or what were you thinking when you’re like, “Hey, we know we’ve got a Vietnam vet in the family here, but they never speak about it?” What was going through your mind when that sort of stuff came up?

Tash Herrmann:
I guess you probably don’t link some of the issues that my dad had. There was a girl that I went to school with whose father was also a Vietnam vet, and we often used to sleepover at each other’s, as you do, teenage girls. It was interesting because she was probably one of the only ones who I’d invite to my house because the consequences of a Vietnam veteran father with undiagnosed PTSD meant that she understood.

Tash Herrmann:
She understood what it was going to be like and how volatile things can be. It was also pretty volatile at her place. Invite other friends over and they kind of didn’t really understand.

Dan:
They didn’t get it.

Tash Herrmann:
They just didn’t get it. We probably didn’t get it, in honesty, because we didn’t know about it. It wasn’t really talked about in terms of PTSD, like it is now. Like it is recognised now, it wasn’t back then. So, it is what it is.

Dan:
It was just one of those things back then. It was just like, “Oh, well.” You just get on with life and you don’t really have that level of recognition that’s available, certainly in the home environment.

Tash Herrmann:
We knew it was different, but we didn’t know why it was different. We knew that dad had been to Vietnam, we knew that he didn’t talk about it, but there just wasn’t that linkage between why are things like they are at home with dad? And it wasn’t till probably our mid to late teens that my sister and I started to have some recognition. Some big things happened for my dad, which were not necessarily great. But, at that stage, we sort of bought into counseling and all the services, the Vietnam Veterans Counselling. That was when we started to make linkages and understand actually what was going on.

Robbie:
Great. It’s so much better now. I’m very, very happy to report. So much better.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, completely different. Completely different. My sister end up joining the military.

Robbie :
That’s pretty cool. Didn’t know that. What did she do?

Tash Herrmann:
So, she was in as a pay clerk to start with.

Robbie:
Great. Very important.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, yeah, absolutely.

Dan:
Everyone wants leave, everyone wants pay.

Robbie:
Yep. Correct.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. So, she had met a fellow who was in the military and she joined after that. She did go overseas and she had some pretty big things happen while she was overseas. And some of the activities that she was involved in while she was over there, we’re super proud of her, but I guess we saw signs then, when she came home, of PTSD. And I guess having been in that, we found out afterwards it’s probably more likely that you also will suffer from PTSD in a circumstance like that when you are the child of somebody who has PTSD. So, it certainly definitely the services that are around, they were better for my sister than they were for my dad, but they still weren’t great for my sister.

Robbie:
What year was that? When did she join? When did she get out?

Tash Herrmann:
I couldn’t tell you when she joined. She’s been out now probably eight years or so.

Robbie:
Okay.

Dan:
Relatively recent then.

Robbie:
Same year.

Jane:
So, even recently the services-

Robbie:
2013, I got out, so yeah.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Yeah.

Robbie:
Okay.

Tash Herrmann:
So, really a lot of the time back then it was, there’s medical, just you weren’t right. Come home and you weren’t right.

Robbie:
I still very much remember, that’s what I’m talking to my psychiatrist about now. He’s like, “Why haven’t you passed on all this stuff?” I’m like, “Mate, if I had have said what I’m saying to you right now, I would’ve been pulled off to the sidelines and benched and not had anything to do with anyone and probably medically discharged.” It was a no go zone back then.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely.

Robbie:
I’m only talking eight years ago and I understand it’s way, way better now.

Dan:
But there’s still, and this is just having spoken to a client as recently as yesterday.

Robbie:
Yeah, I remember.

Dan:
… who was fearful of being able to stand up and go, “Hey, I’ve probably got some PTSD issues here. I need to speak to someone.” And he just didn’t feel comfortable while being within the system. He didn’t feel supported. He didn’t feel enabled to go and have that conversation. So, I think it’s really important that we… I didn’t know that this was where the conversation was going to go this morning-

Robbie:
Never do.

Dan:
… but it’s really important that we’re having an open and transparent conversation about it. The fact that your dad had some issues, your now sister has had some issues. Robbie, you were talking about the fact that you are speaking to someone at the moment. It’s a very relevant thing that it’s just demonstrating that it can affect all of us, whether you are the child of a person suffering from PTSD, or it’s you yourself. The tentacles are long and they’re going to be able to reach you wherever you are. So, it’s something we should be very comfortable in speaking about.

Robbie:
And everyone’s very different.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Yeah.

Robbie:
Like Jane, you’ll probably get PTSD after hanging out with us for another three and a half years in another way.

Jane:
Too late. Too late. No, it’s something that I’ve really come to understand though and learn a lot more about, because I’ve always understood the way the brain works and a lot about mental health. And whilst it’s never really been, in my opinion, a massive issue for me, it’s something that I’ve definitely come into contact with now through a lot of clients and even the guys at work, it’s something that I’m very mindful of and I’m really happy to know that there are this support networks out there now.

Jane:
And also, I’ve got a friend in America whose husband’s in the military over there, and he’s very similar. He’s seen some horrible things and I’ve heard some horrible stories, but he won’t put his hand up and say he’s got these problems and these things in his head, for the same reason, there’s that stigma about it still.

Robbie:
He will one day. It’ll get to a choice whereby you quality of life gets affected, like what happened to me over the last six months. And like, “I need to get this fixed, because I’m not enjoying being here right now.”

Tash Herrmann:
And certainly, I guess, my sister sought treatment because of what happened with dad. Like dad didn’t talk about it, and after they had the Welcome Home parade, it was a couple of years after that things just bubbled and things went drastically wrong. And so we see, or we saw in our family what it was was like to just hold it and hold it and hold it and hold it, the volcano erupted. And it erupted and destroyed lots of things at that point.

Robbie:
So, what did the family say when you and Kent linked up then? So, you ended up meeting a guy in the army.

Dan:
Tell us that story. Tell us the story of Kent and Tash.

Robbie :
Let’s try and keep it PG, because we know that there’s only PG listeners in this podcast.

Tash Herrmann:
So, Kent was on the course down at Albury–Wodonga with my brother-in-law, or the fellow who would become my brother-in-law.

Robbie:
All right.

Tash Herrmann:
And he and my brother-in-law, they were all being posted up to Brisbane. So, they were doing a bit of negotiating at my mom’s house as to who was going to cart some things. Kent needed some tires for a car actually towed up in a trailer. And so there was some negotiating on who could take what in which cars and how it was all going to happen. So, I happened to be dropping off my son for my mom to look after at the time, so I could head off to a netball game, an indoor netball game. So, I was in my very attractive indoor netball gear.

Robbie:
You saw this strapping young army lad there in the house.

Tash Herrmann:
No, I think I pretty much ignored him. But it was, I guess, because he was coming over quite a bit at that stage. My sister and my brother-in-law were leaving, so we’d been out for a couple of times to dinner. Kent was there as well, and we just got talking. And I guess you couldn’t really say we were in a relationship when he left, but I guess the relationship developed.

Robbie:
What year was this?

Tash Herrmann:
So, probably talking 1993, ’94.

Robbie:
Right, so no internet, no Tinder, no Facebook, none of that. So, it was just normal like actual genuine interaction with people.

Dan:
They did not need Tinder, mate.

Robbie:
Yeah, that’s true.

Tash Herrmann:
No, we wrote letters. We did actually write letters to each other. We also helped to increase the Telstra stock significantly at that time.

Jane:
I’ll bet.

Dan:
Plenty of time on the phone.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Monthly bills that were horrendous.

Robbie:
Hundreds of dollars. Yeah, that’s right.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Yeah, yeah.

Jane:
No unlimited plans.

Robbie:
No, no.

Tash Herrmann:
None of that. So, anyway, but I used to come up and visit my sister, stay at my sister’s place in Brisbane and obviously see Ken. And it just developed over time. Eventually he coursed again down to Wagga. He needed to change his course, or he’d wanted to do that aviation course. And so we were really only about 40 minute drive, so he used to come down then and stay on weekends. So, this sort of went on for a couple of years before obviously we decided that we actually like each other. And we developed actually quite a… I think it was good, because we were friends first, and we had to learn to communicate very early on, because the relationship wouldn’t have developed it. It would’ve just dwindled.

Jane:
I can still see that with you guys. Getting to know you the way that I have, I can see that deep friendship that you have and it’s actually a really admirable thing. A lot of couples I know, do not have that. And you guys are just, yeah…

Robbie:
Especially for people that met quite young, and now fast forward 25, 30 years-

Jane:
Absolutely.

Robbie:
… you still got that respect and admiration for each other. It is very difficult. Very unique to come by. It certainly is. There you go. Hey Dan, can you maybe just explain to our listeners, you know a lot about Ken’s background and you’ve got a RAEME background as well, so just who is this gentleman we’re speaking of? Put it in layman’s terms.

Dan:
The man, the myth, the legend.

Robbie:
Yes.

Tash Herrmann:
He’d love that.

Dan:
I suppose Kent would’ve been, so you said he went through the appy school?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, he went through appy school.

Dan:
So, for those RAEME mafia type out there.

Jane:
What’s that?

Dan:
So, the way that it used to occur is there was a full on apprentice trade training centre down in Albury–Wodonga. And what they’d do is relatively young gentlemen would come and they’d live on base and they would get their trade, as well as doing sort of their military training at the same time.

Robbie:
No girls involved at this stage, guys only.

Dan:
Guys only.

Tash Herrmann:
No, I think there was a couple, but not very many. It was not very many.

Robbie:
Sure.

Dan:
This is in the bad old days and Kent might not have been quite in yet, but like the young tradies would use their skills either for good or for evil in the local area, whether that be cars disappearing off the side of the road, getting deconstructed underneath the barracks buildings and stuff like that. So, it was very much in trend with the RAEME mafia back in those days, to make sure that everyone was looked after and everyone had beer tickets from that perspective.

Dan:
But they’d go off and they’d do their trade training. And then eventually after that, they’d move across into the trade training centre, I think was just up the road at Bonegilla at that point in time. So, Latchford is slightly over towards the dam.

Tash Herrmann:
Hume.

Dan:
Called the Hume. And then Bonegilla is back towards the town.

Jane:
Wodonga.

Dan:
Yeah, Wodonga sort of area.

Robbie:
So, this when people go and they now specialise into a certain trade, like a certain technical expertise.

Dan:
And I think Kent would’ve been back in the days of going, doing radio mech type stuff.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, I think it was some radio.

Dan:
So, a true blue boffin from that perspective. Big brain kind of guys, getting all the wires and the programming and everything like that these days. So, that was his background. But Tash, you were saying earlier that he actually wanted to go into aviation space from really early on in the days.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, so I’m not 100% certain on the story behind it. But my understanding was that he was keen in this aviation area and that when you sign up, I’m sure the recruitment centre sort of promised you certain things. And there was this suggestion, my understanding of the story is that he went through as an apprentice and then he could career path into this. But each time he finished at one place, supposedly that had moved from there and moved on and move on.

Dan:
And the next place would allow him to go and change.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes, correct.

Dan:
Does that sound familiar?

Robbie:
Yeah. All you need to do is get your foot in the door and then you can change over when you get there, and that time never comes.

Dan:
It’s still a really typical thing.

Robbie:
And we’re talking about a guy, a very senior WO1 now, so let’s just put that in context. So, Kent’s still serving.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes.

Robbie:
And still happily serving and risen to the absolute top of his trade.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes.

Robbie:
So, for the young Crafties that may or may not be listening, this is a great look into the future, quite frankly.

Dan:
So, it happened to all of those WO1’s as well, it’s going to happen to you as well. So, you might as well just get used to it. That’s the army.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. And so once he’d finished his training, I understand he had to do 12 months on job stuff up here in Brisbane. That’s what he and my brother-

Dan:
As an OJT.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, that’s what he and my-

Jane:
I don’t know what you’re saying.

Dan:
On-the-job training. OJT.

Jane:
Okay. Got it.

Tash Herrmann:
So, that’s what he and my brother-in-law came up to Brisbane for, and they did that 12 months and he was then posted to Townsville. And I think he really only did about six weeks there before he was then recoursed down to Wagga. So, it’s not at the army base. It’s actually on the RAAF Base out there.

Dan:
So, he is getting retrained, respecialised across into-

Robbie:
Well, if we’re talking about aviation electronics, then that’s the school of it down there. So, pretty cool.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. And I think he spent about 18 months down there, before we end up back out at Oakey.

Robbie:
This was the real start. You were sort of not married, separated, but certainly that you were spending significant time away from each other early.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes. Right from word go.

Robbie:
And that’s been maintained pretty much the whole way through, give or take.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, there’s been a fair bit of.

Dan:
So, it was the window where he went into his specialisation in Wagga, was really the time that you guys took off.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes.

Dan:
And then you left, correct me if I’m wrong, you left Albury with him to go to his next posting.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, when he finished his course there, he was posted to Oakey. So, we moved up to Toowoomba, and that was when I moved with him. So, we got engaged and, I don’t know, we got married in the April or some thing, just after he’d been posted up here. And that was in-

Robbie :
What year?

Tash Herrmann:
… ’98.

Robbie:
Okay, ’98. Let’s just take a tangent quickly. Tell us about your teaching career, because that would’ve been blossoming at the same time. No?

Tash Herrmann:
No, mot at all.

Robbie:
Not yet. Okay. Right, right.

Tash Herrmann:
No. So, I’ve only been teaching for seven years. So, I started out just working in admin and finance. And I guess I continued training and I’ve got diploma in project management. So, the fields that I worked in, I sort of did additional training to make me more employable once Kent and I had decided to get married. I knew it was going to mean moving around.

Dan:
You’re following him around.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Robbie:
Sound familiar, ladies and gents?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Robbie:
Yes.

Tash Herrmann:
And I know some people don’t necessarily like that, but the primary career here was Kent’s, let’s be honest. And we always intended to have children, and we always intended for me to take some amount of time off when I’d had those children. And we didn’t mind the moving around, I guess. We see the moving around as a bit of an opportunity really, and it’s led us to some amazing places. We’ve got to see many amazing things that we would never have booked as a holiday, I guess.

Robbie:
How many moves have you ended up doing all up, do you know? Count them.

Tash Herrmann:
17.

Robbie:
Around 17.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Jane:
That’s a lot.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. So, there’s some fantastic things that we’ve done all over Australia. We’ve lived in South Australia in Adelaide. We’ve done a lot of time up in Darwin. We’ve done the Oakey Darwin shuffle a few times.

Dan:
Yeah, the bounce up and down.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Dan:
Tell us about Darwin. Because it’s a unique experience, I’ll tell you. You didn’t do any Darwin time-

Robbie:
Townsville.

Dan:
… apart from coming to visit us for a couple of cheeky beverages on a weekend occasionally.

Robbie:
I went to Darwin probably 20 times, in and out.

Dan:
Yeah. So, I did a few years the there, but what was your experience? And did you do it just as you and Kent and then as a family as well? Just break down that.

Tash Herrmann:
So, we’ve had three turns around in Darwin. Our first go up there, it was amazing. We lived on the RAAF base. So, we lived there for seven years, and the RAAF base environment for a young family was wonderful.

Dan:
So, you already had the family when you went up there?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, because we’d gone from Oakey to Adelaide. We’d been in Adelaide for three years. So, when we went to Oakey, we had our middle child, and then we had our youngest when we were in Adelaide. So, she was a toddler when we went up there, but by the time the kids end up in school, seven years of living in one location and all the kids all attended pretty much the same school, caught the same bus to school. So, you could just let your kids, probably a bit negligent now as a teacher, but-

Robbie:
Let them roam the streets in the RAAF base.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, but the group was-

Dan:
That was just the days back then, no?

Tash Herrmann:
That’s right, but it was 20, 30 kids, and whilst a lot of people didn’t realise that the RAAF base wasn’t closed off. The housing part, anyone could get into. But there was a big fence, so the kids couldn’t really get into too much trouble. And there was a group of probably 20 or 30 of them, and they’d get on their bikes and they’d ride down the park. And you’d end up with 20 kids on your back veranda stealing all of the ice blocks out of our drinks fridge outside.

Robbie :
It’s that proper Aussie outdoor life.

Tash Herrmann:
It was great.

Robbie :
No internet, no Xbox, none of that stuff back then. They’re out there doing shit.

Jane:
I love that.

Tash Herrmann:
And then they’d roll from house to house and-

Dan:
Clear out the ice block fridge everywhere.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Getting sandwiches at someone else’s house and drinks somewhere else, and they had a great time.

Robbie :
I still remember doing that when I was a kid. It’s a great way to live, isn’t it?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, it was perfect for them.

Robbie :
And I know, Jane, you really encourage your kids to do that as well out on the farm.

Jane:
Absolutely. Yeah, out on the farm. That’s right. That’s right. I’m definitely not a helicopter parent, that’s for sure.

Tash Herrmann:
But I think the RAAF base itself, it was the right environment for them. Do you know what I mean? You probably wouldn’t do that just out in suburbia when you mixed in with everyone else and the communities-

Dan:
A bit more unknown out in the general suburbia.

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely.

Dan:
So, that’s rotation one. So, rotation one, seven years living on RAAF base.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. So, we end up back in Oakey. We then went back for what we thought was three years, and that was cut short. We’ve had a few postings for Kent, fortunately being promoted, and our postings have been cut short. Our shortest notice was about three weeks to move to Darwin.

Robbie:
Wow.

Jane:
Wow, that freaks me out.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Well, you’ve got to do it, don’t you?

Robbie :
Toll comes in and packs up your house and away you go.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, the second time around we lived over near the hospital. So, the RAAF base at that stage was being decommissioned. So, many of the houses had been torn down. The house that we had been living in previously hadn’t been torn down, but they were doing so much work there that the houses were-

Dan:
So, a construction zone.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep.

Dan:
The kids would’ve loved the construction zone though.

Tash Herrmann:
Well, they would’ve, but they weren’t allowed in there. So, when we went back, we had two years living in Lions. And Lions is built a lot like Southern Estates are built, where you can just about hear your next door neighbour taking a wee in the morning. They’re really close. Not a great style of housing for Darwin. RAAF base houses were all two story, you’ve got a lot of ventilation.

Dan:
Well suited to the environment.

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely. Not great the second time around.

Dan:
Was that a quick stint though?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, it was cut short. We’re back to Oakey. So, we did two years for that.

Robbie:
What’s Kent by now? A sergeant? Warrant officer?

Tash Herrmann:
I think he was a warrant officer, around there. Because he’d gone and done his sub-four in… So, for Kent’s trade, not all of them, but his sub-four required six months down in Melbourne at RMIT, and then they come back-

Robbie :
It’s a law long stint down there.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And then they come back and they do three or four months maybe at Oakey doing some OGT as well. And then he got his promotion after that.

Robbie :
Just quickly, had you guys started thinking about your financial future by now? Had you bought a house yet? Let’s try and weave that in.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, we’d started way back on our first go at Oakey. So once we’d moved up here and we got married, we’d had our daughter, during that time Kent was, I guess at a unit, I think I want to say 171 maybe. And they were flying, or they were doing a lot of work at PNG over in Bougainville. So, I think it was just peacekeeping over there and the time frames over there, maybe about three months each go. But I think Kent did maybe two or three rounds with that.

Robbie :
Rotations.

Tash Herrmann:
Rotations, but they also used to do helicopter changeovers. They used to-

Dan:
So, spent a lot of time popping in and out of the country.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely. And those rotations would be seven to 10 days or something, or they’d have to go via Townsville, but they had the big orange Jaffa helicopters over there. They’re all painted orange. And that was back at a time, again, not great internet. We had email, but the email wouldn’t go through instantly. So, you could send an email and it might take 45 minutes for the email to arrive for Kent. They had very limited-

Jane:
Snail mail.

Dan:
It was like, “Oh, she’s just emailed me. I’ll get back to her right away. She’ll still be there.” Two days later…

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, this is going to sound weird. The best way to communicate was that we all had to set up RSVP accounts, the dating app. So, we all set up-

Dan:
I didn’t think we were going towards Tinder or dating accounts today, but here we are.

Jane:
Exactly.

Tash Herrmann:
So, here we are. Our RSVP accounts we all had, and so you’d tee up a time that you would log on together.

Jane:
Oh my god, this is so funny.

Tash Herrmann:
And then you had to wait. Everyone was in just a big joint room where you could communicate with anybody who was in the room that. And so you’d have to wait till they get on and then you invite them to a private room. So, then I guess it worked a little bit like an instant messenger service, but because of, I guess, securities and things, they weren’t allowed to… I think they did have MSN messenger, but they weren’t allowed to use that while they were over there.

Jane:
But they could use a dating site.

Robbie :
Use RSVP.com, yeah.

Tash Herrmann:
So, the only way around it somehow, look, I don’t know works.

Jane:
Who figured that out?

Tash Herrmann:
I don’t know. But the first time Kent and I-

Dan:
One of the boys who was on RSVP.

Jane:
Kent let me know, “So, you just need to get onto RSVP and set up an account.” “What? I’m not looking for any [crosstalk 00:27:47].”

Robbie :
Why do you have an account?

Dan:
Kent, how did you figure this out?

Robbie :
Yeah.

Tash Herrmann:
So, anyway, but it was good. You could message each other, because your phone call would be maybe 10, 15 minutes or something like that once a week on the sat phone. And that was awful experience, because you hear the echo about three times before you could respond back to the person.

Robbie :
That is something you need to get used to.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Robbie :
So, he would’ve got some quick little injections of cash.

Tash Herrmann:
Lots of injections of cash with that. We thought we were riding pretty with that injection of cash. Having worked in finance, I was like, “Yeah, this is what we need to do.” We’d researched it. We were pretty happy with going with something negative gearing, because we knew we were looking to move around. So, we didn’t want to buy something that we’d have to sell and then we’d have to buy again and we’d sell again. And whilst defense has got systems set up around that, it seemed like a lot of work, to be honest. So, we happened to come down to Forest Lake. Forest Lake was not yet developed.

Dan:
I was going to say, that must have been really early days.

Tash Herrmann:
Very early days. Very, very early days.

Jane:
When it was the middle of nowhere.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep.

Robbie :
Like Springfield Lakes hadn’t even started.

Tash Herrmann:
No, no. And after we had our house, Springfield Lakes was considered the poor man’s Forest Lake.

Robbie :
Of course, too far out.

Tash Herrmann:
Just too far out.

Robbie :
Just hang on. Just look down my nose right now.

Tash Herrmann:
So, we went out and we thought, “Right, we’re going to build a house.” So, we went through a builder. Appealed to mom, dad, 2.4 kids, this middle of the market. This is how we’re going to do this. And then we went down to the builder and that was way out of our budget. Like drastically. So, what we got was a little cottage block with this little two and a half bedroom place, doesn’t even have a lockup garage. I think land and house build cost us $112,000.

Jane:
Wow.

Tash Herrmann:
And we thought we had enough money to get into something pretty substantial. And no, no, we were kidding ourselves. Anyway-

Robbie :
The interest rates were really high back then. We were talking still like maybe early 2000s?

Tash Herrmann:
Yes.

Robbie :
Are we?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, about 2000.

Robbie :
Okay.

Tash Herrmann:
So, we got what we got, do you know what I mean? We weren’t unhappy about it. It was a lot of work, a lot of work, particularly because Kent was away for the vast majority of it.

Robbie :
This was an older property?

Tash Herrmann:
No, no, no. We built it.

Robbie :
Oh right. You ended up building, but a smaller one.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, much smaller. Part of that was I done a fair bit of research around negative gearing. So, it didn’t have a trendy name then, for us, on this rentvesting, but we’d-

Dan:
You’re welcome.

Robbie :
She knows about it now. And to this day, some people don’t know what that means.

Tash Herrmann:
No. So, when you said it, I was like, “Oh, that’s a perfect name for it.” We’d actually sat down and calculated, the nerdy finance person in me. Don’t worry, Kent-

Dan:
Oh, don’t get me wrong. I’m really impressed by it. But-

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Whipped out an Excel spreadsheet.

Dan:
There you go. Now you’re speaking my language.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. And we’d calculated that even the money that we were spending at that point on our DHA rental, compared to what we were able to write off and what we were able to claim, we were better to sit in a defense house, compared to what we would’ve been able to rent anyway and the cost of renting. It was better for us to do it, to buy an investment property than it was to try and buy our own.

Robbie :
And have the tenant and the tax man pay that off for you.

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely. So, we were probably, I’m going to say late twenties, 27-ish, 28-ish, maybe when we got that house.

Dan:
Jumped into the market.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, I was pregnant with Jordan. Actually, it must have been a little bit before that. She was born in ’99, and it was a lot of work.

Dan:
So, you are doing the build with the builder.

Tash Herrmann:
With the builder.

Dan:
You’re not actually out there laying the bricks.

Tash Herrmann:
No, no, no, but I’m traveling down every couple of weeks.

Robbie :
Are you’re living up into Toowoomba still?

Tash Herrmann:
Living in Toowoomba. Kent was away a fair bit of this. I was having to deciding on things, because there was no sending pictures to him and going, “What color would you like?”

Robbie :
Yeah. Wow. Far out.

Tash Herrmann:
It’s not organized the way the Axon ones are done. So, it was a fair bit of work to do, but we got it and we’re happy with it. And looking back now it’s been our little gold mine. Do you know what I mean?

Dan:
But that one still is sitting in your portfolio, isn’t it?

Tash Herrmann:
It’s actually sitting in our portfolio and without saying how much it’s valued at now, we are aware that we’re looking at in excess of 65,000 in capital gains tax if we sell it.

Jane:
Right.

Tash Herrmann:
That’s how much it’s appreciated over time. So, it’s-

Jane:
Great.

Tash Herrmann:
But, you know-

Dan:
You can wait.

Tash Herrmann:
… whilst I’m sad that if I had to sell it and give the tax man that, it has helped us to get into the additional properties that we’ve got along the way.

Robbie :
Brilliant.

Dan:
So, would you say you effectively tried to get into the market as soon as you possibly could?

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely. We had, as most people do, families sort of… “They bought a house when they were young and paid off your house over 30 years.”

Dan:
So, even back in the early 2000’s or late ’90 Mom and dad is saying, “Do it the way I did it. Buy a house, pay it off.”

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, you need to buy a house, because that’s what the Australian dream was, own your own piece… And it was our dream. It still is. And I guess it’s everyone’s dream to own something that is yours.

Robbie :
And fair enough too.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely.

Robbie :
There’s just a few different ways about how to get there.

Tash Herrmann:
Exactly. So, the trouble for us though, was that we could see how much the market fluctuated in just the short time that we had been looking. And we didn’t want to be put in a situation of we’d moved to a new location and we’d have to sell and we might not be selling at the right time. We might be losing money on something. So, for us buying our own property just didn’t make sense. We wanted to get into the market. But of course at that stage the big thing for negative gearing was you keep the property for eight years. Eight years, sell it. That’s it. Keep it for eight years and it’s gone. Well, that property’s now 22 years old. Our daughter’s 22. So, we didn’t get rid of it, because it was doing too well.

Jane:
Good decision.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely.

Dan:
So, that was number one, number one property, and then you’re doing the Darwin, Oakey, Darwin, Oakey, Darwin, Oakey shuffle.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. And then while Kent was in Darwin, he had another round of peacekeeping. So, he went over to Timor. So, there was another quick injection of money. And it wasn’t that we weren’t saving money, but we’re a young family.

Dan:
It’s hard to save money as a young family.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Kids in childcare, 500 bucks a week.

Robbie :
You were maintaining your work though?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, generally. I mean I tried very hard to keep employable so that each time we moved… There were times, particularly in Darwin, where I cut back to four days a week. Darwin was…

Robbie :
That’s fine.

Dan:
Cut back. I thought you were going to say like to two days a week.

Robbie :
To two days a week. And that still would’ve been okay. It’s better than nothing.

Jane:
Yeah.

Tash Herrmann:
Well, I guess, at one point with childcare and everything else, I was only bringing in something like $130 more a week than if I was-

Dan:
I was going to say, you would’ve run the numbers and you would’ve gone, “Well, I can stay at home with the kids and it will cost me this much, or I can go and do this and it will cost me this much.”

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, and that’s exactly what we did. And $130, some might go, “Oh, it’s not worth going out to work for four days,” but $130 in my pocket-

Dan:
Is better than drinking tea.

Tash Herrmann:
… is still $130 in my pocket.

Robbie :
And you’re being able to engage with others, and you kept motivated, and you’re being employable, and you’re not just sitting at home.

Dan:
And you’re maintaining your set of skills, so the next time you go and you post again, then you’re employable.

Robbie :
Getting baby brain, and it’s so long.

Dan:
It’s so much more than just the monetary aspect I find as well.

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. And I think, particularly because being in Darwin and especially the first seven years that we were there, the unit is so active. So, if they’re not away on a deployment as such, they were off exercising-

Robbie :
Practicing.

Tash Herrmann:
… practicing.

Dan:
That’s all Darwin is about. It’s a very-

Robbie :
High readiness brigade.

Dan:
It’s centered around that. I remember being up there, we’d probably spend six to nine months of the year outfield on activities.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Robbie :
She ain’t a lifestyle posting out there. Like it is, but it’s not.

Dan:
You know when everyone’s back in town and the pubs are absolutely roaring, because everyone’s back in town.

Robbie :
Darwin was roaring back then.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, yeah. It was great. It’s a great lifestyle. I know before we actually moved there, lots of people were, “You’re going to hate it. It’s so terrible. It’s so hot.”

Dan:
I loved it.

Tash Herrmann:
You can sort of ask them, “Have you’ve been there?” “No, but I’ve just heard how terrible it is.”

Robbie :
Thanks champ. Thanks champs.

Tash Herrmann:
Awful.

Jane:
Something to look forward to.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, I was really dreading it, but when you go up there, the winter time is not winter. It’s just the dry season. And so it’s like perfect summer down here. No rain, you can plan things on weekends, you know it’s not going to rain. And even in the buildup and the wet season, as long as you can get some relief with some air conditioning here and there, which when you’re working you’ve got your air conditioning, but a storm would come, the kids would be stripping off their clothes and running in the backyard.

Dan:
It was reliable during the buildup. It’s like, “All right, storm time. Boom.” Storms. Tools down. Move on.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, it was great.

Robbie :
As we’re speaking to you now in late September, that’s pretty much what’s happening.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, exactly. So, we had more injection of cash. We’d sort of saved the money. We’d looked at where we were going to go with this. And we kind of got roped into a spruiker in Darwin. So, this second property didn’t go quite as well. Like our first one was brilliant. Second one, not as great.

Robbie :
Tell us about that. I haven’t heard you use that term before. So, roped in by a spruiker in Darwin. But you didn’t buy in Darwin then did you?

Tash Herrmann:
No, no, no.

Robbie :
Because this is going to resonate with a lot of people, because you are not a lone ranger here.

Tash Herrmann:
No, no, no. So, we had this money, we’d been saving, plus we’d had this injection of funds, and we knew we needed to get into something. Not to put a downer on it, but our first property was getting to a point where we were no longer negatively geared, cash positive. We were moving into a space where we were going to actually be everything positive, which would then mean… The point is we’re going to then be paying tax on that. And we bought that property to help to reduce some of the tax that we were spending. So, they had this investment seminar at one of the big hotels-

Robbie :
So, someone from down south had come up?

Tash Herrmann:
Down south had come up. Well, we didn’t know that. It was just an investment thing that was there. We thought, “Oh, we’ll go along and have a little bit of a look.” They had all the flashy brochures and they told us about the area. So, we actually bought in Holmview.

Dan:
On the spot?

Tash Herrmann:
No, no, no.

Dan:
Okay.

Tash Herrmann:
They were holding a few of them. So, we went back a couple of times. We did look at a few different options. And this was around the time that Kent had also been, or he was going off to do his course, sub-four, down in Melbourne. So, as the build was going to happen, he would actually be in Oakey. So, he was juggling at that stage doing his OJT stuff that he needed for his sub-four, with traveling down to check on the build. So, we end up-

Robbie :
Just for context, Holmview is a south side suburb of Brisbane?

Jane:
Near Beenleigh, isn’t it?

Robbie :
Near Beenleigh?

Tash Herrmann:
It’s classed as being in the city of Logan.

Dan:
Yeah. Right.

Robbie :
Okay.

Jane:
I love the way she pulled that face, when she said Logan. I live in Logan.

Robbie :
Well, the Logan LGA is quite big.

Jane:
I get it. I get it.

Dan:
And for those of you who aren’t living in Queensland. Queensland’s, I suppose our local government areas are probably the largest of all of Australia, because we did an amalgamation activity a few years ago. So, Logan has quite a span from some of the nice fringing suburbs of Daisy Hills and fringing right on the Brisbane City Council region.

Jane:
And even out to the Scenic Rim as well.

Dan:
Scenic Rim covers it as well.

Robbie :
It touches the northern part of the Gold Coast.

Dan:
Exactly right. So, it’s got a good spread. There is, as is in every single LGA, there is some terrible spots and there are some amazing spots, and there’s some spots in between.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Look, and I think Holmview was named Holmview to make it appeal to people. It’s not one of the best spots, unfortunately.

Jane:
There’s an abattoir there.

Tash Herrmann:
Actually, our house is just behind it.

Robbie :
Case in point.

Dan:
Way to increase the value.

Jane:
I’m just saying, I know the area.

Tash Herrmann:
Just so you know, our house is a street back from the abattoir.

Robbie :
I bet that smells amazing.

Jane:
It’s not good.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, no. Look, every time we have been there whilst you do smell it when you go past the abattoir, you don’t actually smell it at the house. So, that part’s okay. But-

Jane:
When the wind blows a certain way though, when you’re living near there like I used to, you can smell it.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Robbie :
Oh yeah.

Jane:
It’s a thing.

Robbie :
Oh yeah.

Tash Herrmann:
So, we had all these flashy things and we thought Southeast Queensland was on the ride. We’d be watching and monitoring and I guess you were tricked into Southeast Queensland. Southeast Queensland is quite a large area, and there are parts of Southeast Queensland that did really well, like Forest Lake, and there’s parts of Southeast Queensland that are not doing so well, like Holmview. So, we end up building a house there, we got tenants in. And look, it looked after itself. It’s no problem at all. We didn’t lose money on it at this point in time, but it didn’t really appreciate in value the way we expected.

Dan:
Yeah. The best way of describing it was more of a stagnant property rather than something that’s moving at the same rate as everything around it.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Look, the rent kept going up. So, in terms of incoming money, we haven’t lost out there. But certainly in terms of when I compare that to our first property, we had capital growth, which is exactly what we were after in our first property.

Robbie:
And good rent return.

Tash Herrmann:
That’s right.

Robbie:
If you can get both, that’s the holy grail.

Tash Herrmann:
Exactly. So, that’s where we were with those. And I guess then Kent did a third posting, or not quite. After our second posting up there, we moved back to Toowoomba and Kent was given an opportunity to go overseas to Afghanistan. So, we had a big cash injection and we knew that we needed to do something with this money. We had a lot that we had sitting there. And when he came home, he was then also unexpectedly posted back to Darwin.

Robbie:
Posted to Darwin. And you guys did that married? Separated?

Tash Herrmann:
We did that married unaccompanied. We just always had a policy as well for both of us with our work that we just don’t say no. It’s just been a yes approach to it.

Jane:
I love that.

Tash Herrmann:
We always said we would never do married unaccompanied, but I guess we got to that stage in our life where our middle daughter had finished high school. And in fact, she graduated the year that Kent was overseas. She was just starting uni. Our youngest was about to start year 11. We knew that the posting to Darwin that Kent was about to do was two year with potential for a 12 month extension beyond that. But the job was a really busy job. So, we could go up there and he was going to be traveling interstate a week every-

Robbie:
He’s a WO1 now, right?

Tash Herrmann:
WO1 now, yep. He was going to be traveling a fair bit anyway. I guess technically he doesn’t have to go to work any earlier than whatever the starting hours are and whatever the finishing hours are, but that’s just not Kent.

Robbie:
And you don’t really report to anyone as a WO1.

Tash Herrmann:
No.

Robbie :
You just go in and do your stuff.

Dan:
So, now he was the Regi ASM. So, the Regiment ASM, wasn’t he?

Tash Herrmann:
Correct, yeah.

Dan:
At [inaudible 00:44:05]?

Tash Herrmann:
Yes.

Dan:
So, that’s top of the trade at the unit, and arguably probably at the forefront of that capability for maintenance.

Robbie :
For the brigade.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And I think during his time there, there was a safety position that he was kind of double handling two jobs. So, he was doing a lot of hours. So, we did the married unaccompanied. We found a little apartment on the waterfront up there.

Dan:
It’s relative luxurious that he was in there, wasn’t it?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And the gas company had just started to shut down up there. So, they had a lot of employees in these fully furnished apartments. So, when we went to move Kent up there, there was this massive flood of fully kitted out apartments going really cheap for rent. So, he was given an amount that he could spend and we found this beautiful two bedroom overlooking Darwin Harbour right down on the waterfront.

Jane:
Perfect.

Robbie:
When I first met you, I believe you used to call it your getaway.

Jane:
That’s my holiday house.

Robbie :
Holiday house. Yes.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep.

Robbie :
Thanks Army.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, that’s right. So, it provided an opportunity. Look, married unaccompanied is hard. It’s hard work. I think without the foundation of communication that we have got, we just don’t… There’s some things where, I guess you can’t say you don’t do it, but like there are some things, but you know each other well enough now that there are some things that if the kids ask you, or there’s decisions to be made, there’s things that I know that Kent’s happy for me to make decisions about, the same as I’m happy for him to make decisions about. But then there’s other things that I’m just not happy to do that without having had that conversation. We might still arrive at the same decision, but-

Dan:
But there’s one way you’re doing it together, or there’s one way you’re doing it apart.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, that’s right. So, we sort of went through that process and Kent had been watching, I think-

Robbie:
I was going to say, let’s transition into how this ism what are we now, 2017, ’18?

Tash Herrmann:
It must’ve been around then, yeah.

Robbie:
Ish. Probably 2018, I reckon.

Tash Herrmann:
I think ’18, yeah. So, Kent had been watching and I was visiting on my holiday.

Robbie:
You were going to your holiday house.

Jane:
To your holiday home.

Tash Herrmann:
Over the Christmas break.

Robbie:
And he probably said, he goes, “Hey hun, I’ve been watching this property spruiker group on the internet. And you probably went, “Oh, let’s just not do that again.”

Jane:
And you probably freaked out.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Robbie:
Tell us about that.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, he was like, “Oh no, we just, we just got to get on, we have this meeting with them. Can we schedule it?” And I’m like, “Really?”

Jane:
Oh, how times have changed.

Robbie :
I love hearing these stories.

Dan:
Because for our audience, we didn’t know anything about how the Holmview property came to be or anything like that. So, we’re hearing about this for the first time. So, I’m glad to see Tasha’s reaction when she’s telling us now. Like, “And then I had to speak to you guys.”

Robbie:
So, it was me as the coach and Dan, you were my property specialist.

Tash Herrmann:
Well, actually I think we spoke to both of you, was our first intro one.

Jane:
Together.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, it was done together.

Dan:
The dynamic duo at that point in time.

Jane:
Old days.

Tash Herrmann:
And I think Kent knew he probably needed to convince me. And not that he needed to convince me that we needed to buy something, because we’d been talking about that for some time.

Robbie :
And you had cash sitting there after the Afghan deployment.

Tash Herrmann:
That’s right. We needed to do something. But it was just more once burnt, we were a little bit shy. Because once they sold us the property, the Holmview one, I don’t know whether it was the developer that sold it to us really. Honestly now when I look back at it, I don’t know if it was the developer or who it was, or an intermediary, but that was it. Contract signed, see you later.

Dan:
Never heard from them again.

Tash Herrmann:
Never.

Robbie:
Wow.

Jane:
What a familiar story this is though. How many times have we heard this?

Tash Herrmann:
It was very different with our first house, because we went directly with the builder. So, it was a very small company, much more personable. Not that there was a build support or anything like that. But when we had the baby, we got some flowers sent. They were a little bit more personal approach. The second house, no, there was none of that.

Robbie :
Churn and burn.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, it was. Exactly, churn and burn. So, I was just more concerned-

Robbie :
Of course, you don’t want to repeat the mistakes of the past.

Tash Herrmann:
… that we were going to go into something and be sitting there and going, “Hmm, when do they wipe their hands of us? Where exactly are you thinking that you want us to buy a house?” And you guys were sort of talking a bit around about Southeast Queensland. I go, “Right. So, where exactly?” Because we’ve done this party trick and not everywhere in Southeast Queensland is a winner.

Robbie:
No.

Jane:
Absolutely.

Dan:
No, absolutely not. If you would’ve said Logan at that point in time, what do you think our response would’ve been?

Tash Herrmann:
Well, I don’t know. I think you guys probably would’ve gone, “Hmm,” as well.

Dan:
Think you received some feedback about that property at Holmview.

Tash Herrmann:
Well, we actually looked at selling that.

Dan:
Yes, I remember.

Robbie:
Didn’t we get evaluation done or something, just to try and understand the position of it? Because we don’t like to speculate, we like to deal with real time numbers.

Dan:
Let’s just find out the numbers.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And so the property, I think, had maybe gone up about $10,000 or $15,000, and we’d had it for maybe eight years at that stage.

Jane:
Wow.

Tash Herrmann:
So, cash wise in terms of-

Dan:
It was working, but it wasn’t doing everything it’s supposed to.

Tash Herrmann:
That’s right. It was kind of working alongside of our first property. If you’d had that on its own as the only property you had, we would’ve been in a world of hurt.

Robbie:
Just stuck in the mud.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. But because, I guess, the other property was working so well-

Dan:
You had a little bit more of an offset.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Robbie:
Sorry to butt in, you probably had a little bit more belief then as well.

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely.

Robbie:
You went, “When we get this right, we know it does work. We just don’t know how to take the next step, so we need some coaching and mentoring.”

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And I guess once we had that first conversation with you guys, I will say like after the very first one we got off and I’m like, “Who’s this swearing head?”

Jane:
Are you talking about Dan?

Robbie:
No.

Dan:
I was probably very [crosstalk 00:50:30].

Robbie :
There’s two R’s in Turner.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. I did say to Kent, “Please tell me that all officers are not like that.”

Jane:
What did he say?

Robbie :
That is true. All officers are not like me.

Dan:
No, no, you’re a special breed, mate.

Tash Herrmann:
I was a little bit like, “Holy shit.”

Dan:
It would’ve been a relatively intense experience, because Robbie’s a relatively full on person.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely. And it was. I mean it was good that you’re passionate about it, but I guess because it wasn’t that I didn’t want to go into new property, but because of what we’d had with that second one, I was just a little bit hesitant in making sure that who we went with was going to be the right fit and do the right thing by us and so forth. So, we were a little bit hesitant about that.

Tash Herrmann:
I’m not really sure how… I don’t think we got to choose as such who our coach was. It ended up being Dan, but I think we sort of had a group conversation with both of you and then we had a second conversation when I’d come back Toowoomba. So we were then having to tee up different times-

Dan:
Different timings.

Tash Herrmann:
… because I was in Toowoomba, Kent was in Darwin, and you-

Robbie :
It must have been a little transition, because certainly you were starting to take on your own clients then. And I guess when we found out you guys did have a bit of experience-

Tash Herrmann:
It would’ve been the RAEME path.

Robbie :
… and the RAEME connection with Kent. I was like, “Yeah, sweet.”

Dan:
The rest is history.

Robbie :
Yeah, that’s right. Dan just sort of took over the show.

Tash Herrmann:
I guess it was just proposed that Dan would be the coach and we were like, “Yeah, yeah, cool.”

Robbie :
And he swears less.

Jane:
He’s less offensive.

Tash Herrmann:
It’s not that I’m opposed to the swearing, but I guess-

Robbie :
Bit of a shock and awe treatment.

Tash Herrmann:
It is, because in business that’s just not what you see really. Do you know what I mean? And so having been someone who’s worked in finance and accounts and things like, that’s just not what you see outside of the military workforce.

Robbie :
Would’ve been very chalk and cheese compared to the flashy presentation you went to in Darwin that time.

Jane:
With the spruiker.

Tash Herrmann:
Very much.

Jane:
Is that what won you over?

Robbie :
I’ll take that as a compliment. But clearly we built the business to really relate to the defense member, and then the spouse is sort of there. And I thought if Kent’s away while in the army, he’s been around long enough. I don’t think there’s anything I could say that would offend him.

Tash Herrmann:
No.

Robbie :
So, I know that him and I got on very well and we do to this day, but I guess that’s another reason why Dan, you and I are not the exact same person. We do have that bit of balance straight away.

Jane:
Yeah.

Tash Herrmann:
And it worked out really well. Again, not that Kent wasn’t opposed in the first two houses, but I guess he just didn’t really have the full finance understanding of how things worked with our first two properties. And I don’t know, the presentation, the whatever, the way you guys put it all together, to see Kent come out of it like, “Right, I see now how this all keeps going.” So, we built house three with you guys.

Robbie :
And you would’ve been introduced to Jane. Let’s bring her into the conversation.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, Jane was our-

Robbie :
She’s sitting there very patiently for half an hour.

Jane:
I’m just in awe. I just love it. There’s so many things that Tash is saying that’s just got me amazed. I know you really well by now, but there’s things I’m learning right now that I’m loving it. It’s good.

Tash Herrmann:
Well, Jane was our build support person and it was amazing. Just the whole process was amazing. And Kent was pretty keen. Look, we got a handover and was really a couple of weeks later and Ken’s like, “Right, let’s do it again.”

Jane:
Let’s do it again.

Tash Herrmann:
And I think Dan was the one who goes, “Uh, lets just-

Robbie :
Let’s just check the numbers.

Tash Herrmann:
Give me a break for a second.

Dan:
I remember afterwards we were like, “Let’s just catch up for breakfast over on the Northside. So, obviously Kent and you were now in the same location, which was very good. And we just caught up for breakfast. Kent was like, “All right, we’re ready to go.” And I’m like, “Hey man, this might not work.”

Jane:
They’re like, “I’ll tell you when you’re ready.”

Dan:
Because there was a couple of things that happened during the finance process, because I think the youngest was finishing off school at that point in time. So, we just had to adjust some things to make sure the numbers worked at that point in time as well.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, that’s right. And so financially we had enough money. I think the money that we’d had coming out of the Afghanistan deployment, looking back at it, we probably could have gone two houses at that stage. There was enough in the bank for that. And just with what we were saving and we were back to having one child at home, we kept that money going. So, we had enough to-

Dan:
Great money habits allowed you to be able to leverage straight into the next property.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Straight into the next property. So, we were ready to go. Our whole process, what won us over, whilst we loved all the presentations and working with you guys, the whole team, there was a thing that happened for us during our build that Jane helped us out with. And it was a pretty major thing that happened. And at this point in time, so we were coming up to the finish of the build, Kent was still in Darwin.

Dan:
Still in Darwin.

Tash Herrmann:
We had our youngest graduating from school, from year 12, and we were trying to organize a double removal. So, a removal from Darwin and a removal from Toowoomba down to Brisbane. And we had a really major and serious family event happened for us, that we won’t get into. But I didn’t even know what to do. There were things that I had to sign. There was things that were coming in that I just couldn’t… At that point, I couldn’t even think, like that’s how big it was for us.

Robbie :
Because it’s relatively busy at the end of the build. You got your build, you got your PCI stuff going on. You’ve got to get insurances in place, sign up the property manager to get the tenants in there. And I know there’s a lot of synchronization that goes on. So, it’s like it happened at the worst time. I guess that’s what you’re saying.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely the worst time. And I think Jane rang for something.

Jane:
I think Kent actually rang me in the end.

Tash Herrmann:
But I know I got a call and I don’t think I was even communicating. Blah, blah, blah, blubbering my eyes out. And Jane just said to me, “Just don’t do anything.”

Jane:
Don’t worry.

Tash Herrmann:
“Just leave it.” And we literally were just completely hands off. And she said, “I’m only going to send you stuff that I need you to sign.” So, that’s what we did. And it was after that and recovering from that, and you guys came back and you checked up on us once we’d settled. We caught up with Dan. It was really important to us, because that meant more in the way that the business handled that for us, and it really showed to the character of the people we were dealing with. And I guess that was sort of a big telling thing for us.

Robbie :
I love it how you say that, but to be fair, of course that’s what we were going to do. Of course we were going to do everything we possibly can, send some flowers, try and make you feel better. You just focus on resolving that, and we’ve got everything else for you. We got you back.

Tash Herrmann:
But I guess that might feel normal to you.

Robbie :
Totally.

Jane:
It does.

Tash Herrmann:
Having worked in other businesses, that’s not normal.

Jane:
No.

Tash Herrmann:
Right. That’s not a normal approach. What they’ve got going on out there, that’s not the focus. Business is about making money, it’s not about dealing with that stuff. So, that really hit home for us. And obviously we had the money. We didn’t go back to any of the others. We didn’t go back to that builder for a second property. We didn’t go back to those brokers for a second property, but we went back to Axon.

Tash Herrmann:
So, we were ready to go again. And I think the night of… We actually were given two properties to choose from in two locations. We’d had all the conversations.

Dan:
You’d spoken about a couple of locations.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And we’d actually had the conversation with Dave as well. He’d presented the properties to us. We were like, “Sweet.

Robbie:
These were going to be your fourth investment property.

Tash Herrmann:
Fourth investment. Yeah.

Dan:
And this was COVID hitting time.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, just after COVID, and these ones we were out of Southeast Queensland. We were looking at New South Wales at this point.

Jane:
That’s right.

Dan:
Yeah, so we took you away from that fearful thing of, “Oh, Southeast Queensland again.”

Robbie:
Because there was a pretty major change that happened. I think you needed to jump in from a strategy perspective. Is that where you’re going to?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, so Kent got an unexpected promotion. Kind of, I don’t know, it’s a tier thing.

Dan:
Yeah. So, he was going from tier A ASM to tier B.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, what that meant then was that he was moving across to Enoggera. So, our plan that we had discussed with Dan was our posting here was for three years, there was a particular posting that Kent was looking at potentially going down and doing for three years in Canberra. So, we were sort of adding up, “Yeah, yeah, we’ve got five years and then at the end of five years, then we might be looking for our own home. So, it’s all good.” Of course this thing came along and all of a sudden we were no longer entitled to a married quarter. Because we owned the little Forest Lake place, it was within distance, and because we now technically had no children at home, two and a half bedroom.

Dan:
It was now a suitable residence.

Tash Herrmann:
It was a suitable residence.

Robbie:
I think that’s about 28 kays or something from Enoggera. So, it was inside that 30 kay radius, give or take.

Tash Herrmann:
It’s a painful drive from that location.

Jane:
These conversations though that we were having at that point, you’re like, “I can do this, this or this.” And I’m freaking out internally for you. Tash was just so calm. She’s like, “Oh, well it is what it is. What can we do?”

Tash Herrmann:
Yep.

Jane:
We just had to work it out, and we did.

Tash Herrmann:
We had to work it out.

Robbie :
And Dr. Dan jumped in, like, “Actually, what don’t we think about doing this?”

Tash Herrmann:
I think we had to ring, because I think we were ready to make the decision on the fourth investment, we had to ring Dave back and go, “Actually, can you just like… Don’t-

Jane:
Let’s put it on ice.

Dan:
Let’s just go back and have a chat about the plan.

Robbie:
Yes.

Tash Herrmann:
This has happened. And of course we were having tread water a little bit, because Kent had been advised that this was going to happen.

Dan:
But the posting order hadn’t been struck yet.

Tash Herrmann:
But the posting order hadn’t been-

Robbie:
So, this was like a three or four week gap, it would’ve been, between the two?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely. So, it was horrendous. Anyway. Terrible timing. We went looking for land.

Dan:
Yeah, absolutely. I remember, and this is a very big change for you guys, because the other properties have been like, this is all about the dollars and the numbers and everything like that. I remember the distinct pivot where you were like, “Yeah, so we want a really big block of land and we don’t want it necessarily in an investment location. We want it away, and it’s different.”

Robbie:
It’s our lifestyle decision.

Dan:
It’s now our lifestyle decision. I remember going, “Well, we need to flip this process on its head here, Tash.”

Jane:
Yep. Change plan.

Robbie:
Not that it’s something we don’t know how to do. Clearly. It was a major pivot in the direction.

Dan:
And we absolutely just literally went shopping then. And we were like, “All right, let’s go and see what’s available and let’s go on the hunt.”

Tash Herrmann:
Weekend after we-

Jane:
On that block.

Tash Herrmann:
… going and finding and looking and seeing. And then once we’d sort decided on the block, then-

Dan:
Then the fun starts.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, then it was like display village after display village. “This is what I want. This is what I want.”

Dan:
The design that I want, and this is the additions that I’d like.

Robbie:
Was it pretty custom built, was it? Or the modification of an existing design?

Tash Herrmann:
There’s kind of a-

Jane:
A bit of both.

Dan:
It’s a bit of both. So, we sort of blended a couple of things. There were some very strong tweaks that we needed to put in place.

Robbie:
Beautiful.

Dan:
It was a baseline house that we sort of templated ourselves off, which was nice.

Robbie:
Cool.

Tash Herrmann:
There were some quite distinct things based on on the block and the directions and the facings of what we wanted, and that’s where we went. So, we are property number four, but three of them are investment and one is our own dream home.

Robbie:
Three investment and you’ve got your own home. Yeah, that’s so good.

Dan:
I mean it’s one of those things you’ve gone through the different approach with it being your own home compared to an investment property. But like how is the difference in emotion when you’re getting to the completion of this forever home for you guys, versus the completion of these investment properties?

Tash Herrmann:
Look, your own home just does not go fast enough.

Jane:
You were itching to get in there.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Yeah. You can see, and because it’s in an area, and I’m sure Robbie, you’re the same. We didn’t even go near our third property at all. Like the first time we saw it I think was-

Dan:
It was at completion. The tenants have moved in.

Tash Herrmann:
… it was at completion. The tenant had moved in. But because it’s within driving distance, we were out there every weekend. It’s a massive block. We had to mow the lawn.

Dan:
You had mowed the lawn literally 24 hours after you settled on the block.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes. Correct.

Jane:
We remember seeing the post on Facebook. “Oh, they’re out there again.”

Tash Herrmann:
“Look at us mowing our lawn.”

Robbie :
This for the dirt that we own.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Yeah.

Robbie:
And the slab goes down.

Tash Herrmann:
Kent had to buy a ride-on mower.

Jane:
I bet you he hated buying that.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. But you’re out there, you’re seeing the progress. And whilst the build support team do a great job of monitoring that for you in an investment property, because you’re not emotionally attached or emotionally invested in there, you don’t really care. Do you know what I mean? Like we didn’t.

Robbie:
You just want to know what’s going on and everything’s on track and that’s about it.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, tick, tick.

Robbie:
But now when you emotionally care…

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And it’s really hard. We say to Jane sometimes, ring her up, “Please tell me if I’m being too picky. Tell us to pull our heads in.” But you go out and go, “Well, we noticed that the bench top is not the one that we thought that we were…” “Oh, isn’t it?” “No.” “Oh, it’s just a mistake. Well, do you want to know about that now, or do you want to wait till we get…” “No, no, no. Tell us now.” But there’s some things that they are like, “Those things will get fixed up later.” So, it’s sort of working that final… Jane was often, sorry, Jane, “Do you want to know, or do you not want to know?”

Jane:
You always apologise first, which I thought was really funny. Because you’d ring and be like, “I’m really sorry, but…” and I’m like, “Why are you apologising?”

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. But it was just knowing what things they want to know about, and what things, “No really, just stop being picky and wait until there’s some corrections, or the defect stuff is picked up.”

Jane:
And that’s the thing. Quite often things will happen in a build in a different order to what you might expect. So, you guys are out there and you’re saying, “Oh, this has been done, but this hasn’t.” So, I guess having us be able to tell you, “Yep, you’re right. Yep, no.”

Robbie :
Just having someone to bounce ideas off, really?

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely.

Robbie :
It’s great.

Tash Herrmann:
Many messages, “It’s the annoying ones again. Sorry.”

Jane:
Uncle Kent and Auntie Tash.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, yeah. Auntie Jane, yeah.

Dan:
That’s fantastic. So, you guys are now in the forever home, or you’ve nearly moved in there, so you’re still unpacking the boxes?

Tash Herrmann:
Some boxes.

Dan:
Some boxes.

Tash Herrmann:
We’re five weeks in.

Dan:
How are you enjoying it?

Jane:
We’re still waiting for the house warming.

Dan:
Yeah, but that’ll come.

Jane:
It’s going to be soon.

Dan:
How are you guys enjoying it now you’re in your forever home? It’s been a long time coming, because you’ve been in the military, you’ve done the rent-vesting thing for 20 plus years where you’ve done it. Has it been worth the wait?

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. And I guess in our mind, back when we bought our first property, we honestly thought whatever properties we buy, we are going to have to sell all of those things up to be able to get into our own house.

Jane:
Wow.

Tash Herrmann:
And that’s not how it’s worked. I mean obviously we accessed [inaudible 01:05:34]. We were pretty lucky with COVID. We accessed the COVID payment.

Robbie :
HomeBuilder Grant as well.

Dan:
Cheeky little COVID.

Robbie :
Great.

Tash Herrmann:
Because we missed out on first home buyers, because we’ve got investment properties. So, we don’t-

Dan:
Because your investment properties had been bought before the critical marker in time.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, without a doubt, it’s worth it. And we didn’t think we would be where we’re at when we started 22 years ago.

Robbie :
I’m talking to lots of clients at the moment. They’re like, “Yep, mid to late twenties, we think we want to go and settle over here, but I still want to do another 20 years in the military.” And I’m like-

Tash Herrmann:
Don’t do it.

Robbie :
… “Bro, I assure you, the way you think about where you want to settle in your mid twenties is not the way you think about where you want to settle when you’re in your mid thirties, or when you’re in your mid forties, let alone when you’re in your mid fifties and you want to do that.” You guys hadn’t even chosen the suburb, or correct me, had you chosen your suburb of where you wanted to live?

Dan:
Not even when they started looking at land.

Robbie :
Yeah. You said the wait has been worth it. Please, ladies and gents, if you’re a young guy or a young lady trying to visualize where your dream home’s going to be one day-

Dan:
In 30 years time.

Robbie :
… and you’re not 40 years old yet, you haven’t found it.

Tash Herrmann:
No.

Robbie :
You think you might have found it, but the likelihood of you thinking the exact same way in 20 years times is very low.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. Look, we thought that we’d probably be closer to the Sunshine Coast, in honesty. We like that area, but I guess the more that that’s developed as well, we didn’t want just those-

Robbie :
You couldn’t get your block where that is.

Tash Herrmann:
No, no, you can’t. We didn’t want a boxed in house.

Dan:
And then you needed to be able to get back to Enoggera as well for Kent.

Tash Herrmann:
That’s right.

Dan:
And your work was still… Because it got brought forward five to seven years, it kind of changed the goal post a little bit from that perspective as well.

Tash Herrmann:
Absolutely. So, we initially started looking out, I guess, Samford way.

Dan:
Yeah, Samford Valley.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah.

Jane:
Beautiful spot.

Tash Herrmann:
Beautiful and very-

Dan:
Check book. Get your check book.

Robbie :
Very expensive.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, some of the blocks that we looked at were perfect blocks and perfect locations.

Robbie :
How much?

Tash Herrmann:
In excess of 750 for the block.

Robbie:
For the land only.

Tash Herrmann:
And the land size was smaller than what we end up getting.

Dan:
It was just an area that had been discovered already. I’d say the area that you are in is somewhat less discovered, or less well known for the tranquility that you get out there.

Robbie:
For now.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. So, Dayboro’s very touristy in terms of people come in, there’s a bit of a bakery there.

Dan:
Every weekend-

Tash Herrmann:
Every weekend we get motorbikes through.

Robbie:
Beautiful.

Tash Herrmann:
There are a few developments that have occurred there, but the developments are not the little shoebox houses. You’re talking-

Robbie:
Semi rural?

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, semi rural. So, you’re talking anywhere from sort of 1,200 up to around about 6,000 square meter blocks.

Robbie:
Large lifestyle blocks.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely.

Robbie :
Terrible for an investment property.

Tash Herrmann:
Yes, correct.

Robbie :
There’s no way I’d want to own one of them as any investment property.

Dan:
Imagine being the tenant and the lawn mowing you’d have to do?

Robbie:
Exactly. I’ve got another quick question for you. This is one of our other key messages. Imagine if you knew that wasn’t your forever home, but you poured a whole lot of emotion into it, like I know you have, and even let’s just say that Kent then gets another posting to Darwin and you’re like, “All right, we’re at that stage of life, babe. I can’t live without you now, but we’re going to come back to our forever home.” Could you imagine leaving it and turning it to an investment property and allowing someone else to live in it?

Dan:
Watch this on YouTube, by the way, because Tash started shaking your head-

Robbie:
Before I’d even finished asking the question.

Dan:
… halfway through.

Robbie:
The course term that I use, like the umbilical cord that you would have back to that property would be unbreakable. It’s almost like you’re tearing up even thinking about it.

Jane:
She’s like at it like, “No.”

Robbie:
She’s like, “No one’s ever going to fucking live in that house.”

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, no one’s ever going to live in that house. So, we’ve had that conversation. There’s a couple of things that have occurred since then for Kent in terms of postings, we kind of expected then that we’d just see the postings out here. There may be a bit of a twist to that.

Robbie:
Interesting.

Tash Herrmann:
We’ve done the married separated. We’ve done that for two years. At the end of that time, we went, “Right, never doing that again.”

Robbie:
Never say never.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. Never say never. So, if the circumstance arises, we are well aware that we won’t. I will stay in the house, because no one else is going in there. That’s our house.

Robbie:
That’s your castle. And good on you too, that’s just great.

Dan:
I think the youngest feels that she might be able to look after the place for her.

Jane:
She did say that.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, great.

Robbie :
Sorry youngest, if you are listening.

Tash Herrmann:
Mom loves you.

Robbie:
But that was a, “Fuck no,” from mom.

Dan:
Oh, Tash. I suppose one last question before we sort of close off here. One of the distinct values that you bring to this session today is that you’ve been the spouse of a very active military member with deployments, done the unaccompanied thing. If you had to pass on a message to young Tash or someone like young Tash, right at the beginning of their spouse’s military career, what lessons would you pass on? What’s some of the key things that you’ve learned on the way that you’d like to pass onto the past Tash?

Tash Herrmann:
I guess shit happens.

Jane:
That’s a good one.

Robbie:
I love that.

Tash Herrmann:
And you can guarantee, Murphy’s law, that as soon as they go away, something will happen. And we talked about this. It’s not that it only happens when they go away. It’s just that when there’s only one of you to try and deal with it, it feels bigger. Do you know what I mean?

Jane:
Compounds, yeah.

Tash Herrmann:
Compounds. Correct. But I guess I’m actually pretty happy with how we have approached Kent’s career. Same as mine. I changed careers. I studied and changed careers to be employable, but we’ve always just said it was always yes. When it came to careers, it was always yes. And whilst it might throw a spanner in the works, you deal with it. Do you know what I mean? It’s given us so many opportunities. We’ve seen parts of Australia locally for each of the locations that we’ve been in, that we would never have packed up and gone on a holiday across the Nullarbor if we weren’t living in-

Robbie:
And met life long friends.

Tash Herrmann:
That’s right. We’ve got friends from all those-

Robbie:
All across the country.

Tash Herrmann:
Yep. And we’ve loved it. Being in Darwin, I trained in Darwin, the same thing. I got to go and do prac placements overseas, teaching overseas. It worked the same for both of us. Whilst we allowed Kent’s career to be the primary career, we just never said no.

Dan:
Always said yes and viewed it as an opportunity.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah. And, and yes, even when you say yes, it’s still okay to go, “Oh, for fuck’s sake.” But do you know what I mean?

Jane:
There she goes.

Dan:
Because we all do.

Tash Herrmann:
Yeah, absolutely.

Jane:
Of course.

Tash Herrmann:
But just look at it with a opportunity instead of-

Robbie :
The military is a wonderful organisation that really, really looks after its people. And certainly the conversations that we are no doubt having is for people that do want to say yes, and people that want to keep drinking the military Kool-Aid, for the right people, we’ll sort of look after you. If people want to buck the system and then think they can work it to their own advantage, then that’s when things sort of start to go pear shaped.

Tash Herrmann:
And I think you try and fight it, you’re just going to make life hard for yourself. So, just don’t fight it. Let it happen and just organise around it.

Dan:
Let the wave wash over you and you’ll be fine.

Robbie :
Or if it’s not for you, get out, go do something else.

Tash Herrmann:
That’s it. You’ve got a choice.

Robbie :
Because there’s no one bigger person in the organisation and the organisation will always come first, regardless of how much whinging goes on there. So, such a wonderful interview that we’ve just done now, a quick little podcast with you. So, I hope everyone draws a whole lot of inspiration. There’s lots of little nuggets of gold that you’ve passed on from a lifestyle, a resilience, a wealth creation and a mindset perspective. So, it’s been really interesting to listen to, and I’ve loved watching your facial expression, Jane. She’s like, “I had no idea about that sort of stuff.”

Jane:
There’s so much that I knew, but so much I didn’t. And just hearing your attitude about where the military’s taken you and always saying yes, like that’s a life lesson for anybody, whether you’re in the military or not. I think that’s just such an amazing attribute to have, for you to be able to do that your entire adult life really. It’s just hat off to you. It’s amazing.

Tash Herrmann:
Thanks.

Robbie :
Brilliant. Thanks for joining us, Tash.

Dan:
Cheers Tash.

Jane:
Thanks Tash.

Robbie :
See you later everyone.

Jane:
See you.

Robbie :
Have a great day. Bye.

 

 

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