Axons Unleashed Podcast Episode 6: The recruitment of Dane - am I in the “friend zone?” | Axon Property Group Skip to content
Axons Unleashed Podcast Episode 6: The recruitment of Dane - am I in the “friend zone?”

Axons Unleashed Podcast Episode 6:
The recruitment of Dane – am I in the “friend zone?”

Axons are part of the neuro-transmission system in the brain… they carry the spark between the neurons to fire the body into action!
This podcast will get your Axons fired up by our hosts Robbie, Tamara, Dan and Dane as they uncover the untold truths of what it really takes to successfully transition from the ADF, how to build a multi-million-dollar property portfolio, how to start a business as a veteran entrepreneur and how to more effectively communicate with your partner… while optimising your personal performance in every aspect of your life.

The team at Axon has grown rapidly, but one of the most important additions to the team wasn’t as easy as it should have been! In episode 6, hear about how Dane and “Mr Turner” did the “friend-zone” dance that led to Dane becoming one of the elite Axon Property Coaches.

Listen to Axons Unleashed:

TRANSCRIPT:

Robbie:
Good day everyone, it's Robbie here from Axon Property Group, and we've got Dan, we've got Dane, and we've got Tamara with us. Welcome to version six of Axon Unleashed. Morning everybody.

Tamara:
Good morning.

Dane Roche:
Hi.

Dan:
You can tell you're excited today because the volume just went up like 10 levels.

Tamara:
Dan and I just went boom.

Robbie:
I'm excited to have the great man himself come and join us, Dane Roche, how are you buddy?

Dane Roche:
Good, good, good. I'm looking forward to today.

Robbie:
Long time listener, first time caller.

Dane Roche:
Made the starting line-up.

Dan:
He's been pulled off the bench, we needed a couple of reinforcements and here we are.

Robbie:
So welcome to episode six, so we'll basically be doing a full chronological version of events as far as how Axon started, how we got to this point. So we finished off version five with the growing pains that we all needed to go through.

Tamara:
And Hawaii.

Robbie:
And Hawaii, and that's when we realized that for us to then to start to move towards really making a difference and really being able to help a large amount of people in one calendar year, it couldn't just be the small nucleus of five or six people that we had working in the business, that we needed to grow. So enter stage left the man himself.

Tamara:
Well, we basically decided, and I put some ads up on Seek over the Christmas period, and started to kind of advertise for our next property specialist. And I remember we did have a couple of really strong applicants at the time and we went down a few avenues down there, and there was one particular guy that, strong contender, and we had a couple of chats and ninth hour, what do you call it? 11th hour?

Robbie:
Yeah, he basically contacted us, he goes, "Look, it's awesome, it sounds really great." And this guy had a strong Int Corps background, senior NCO at [Worronophs 00:01:40] or I can't remember, but you know what, he just said, "Look, we're located in Adelaide right now. The family doesn't want to move to Gold Coast so soon, please keep me in mind for future options." And we're like, "Fuck. I thought this guy..."

Dan:
He was an excellent fit.

Robbie:
Excellent.

Dan:
Sounded like an excellent fit on paper [crosstalk 00:01:55].

Tamara:
Yeah, back to the drawing board.

Dan:
A couple of times, so it was what it was. It's not the right time for you, so therefore it's not an actual right fit for the whole organization.

Robbie:
And I reckon Tammy, maybe fast forward 72 hours, because we were still all on Christmas break, you and I were down visiting your family in Terrigal. This is Christmas 2019.

Tamara:
They would hate that you call it Terrigal.

Robbie:
Down around that area.

Tamara:
Blue Bay.

Robbie:
No one knows where fucking Blue Bay... I didn't know where Blue Bay was.

Tamara:
Long Jetty.

Robbie:
But I know where that is.

Dan:
Central Coast, New South Wales.

Tamara:
Yes.

Robbie:
Anyway, we were down there and I was a little bit deflated actually because I was speaking to you, Dan, I'm like, "It's going to be awesome, you've been asking for an Int Corps person for a couple of years now. Your wife did many years in the Int Corps." So I'm like, "All right, sweet, we're going to have that covered." Then when he said he can't come through, I'm like, "Back to the drawing board." Wasn't 72 hours later, ding.

Tamara:
Bing.

Robbie:
We got another little thing come through, we got another application.

Tamara:
Yeah, we got our application from the Mr. Dane Roche. And I guess before we continue on our side, I think it's probably best if we kind of flip over to your side, Dane, and share with us about why you were looking, what the situation was about looking at the ad, and what kind of attracted you to working for Axon?

Robbie:
And maybe also can you just let us know who are you, man? When did you join the military, give us everyone listening and watching...

Tamara:
Well, I guess that comes in to how you fit the job ad.

Robbie:
Yeah, 100%.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, definitely. Okay, well I'll give my background first and then talk about how I got to applying for Axon. So the first thing I guess, when I first finished school, I was a bit of a scallywag. So I went and worked with my father at his business, right? So I started off and there I was sort of doing elementary stuff at the start. They had a financial planning arm there, so he ran an accountancy firm, so a lot of them were getting in, they were getting sort of financial advisors on the side. So you have your accountants dealing returns and taxes and so on and so forth, and then you'd have your financial planning looking at all your forward projections out of that.

Dane Roche:
So I started working there and then I had to obviously go get some qualifications. I really enjoyed stocks and finance and stuff like that, so I started working there and I actually really enjoyed it, but I was always sort of my dad's son at work, you know what I mean? Because he had grown this business from the ground up and was quite successful, so he had the largest regional accountancy firm in Queensland.

Tamara:
Nice.

Robbie:
Awesome.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so had about five different offices and he's a very intelligent man, but I wanted to break free of that. So when I worked for him, it was a fee for service model. So you'd come in, so if you wanted to turn around and downgrade something or say something wasn't right for someone, you could do that. I then wanted to fly the coop a bit and go and spread my wings somewhere else, but I didn't really find the best platform when I did that. So I worked for another firm at the time. They got bought by Crowe Horwath in the end, so they were called [LOK 00:04:34] Walkers, and they were actually very much more incentivized around commissions and so on and so forth. And I'll talk about it a bit later on I think, but I've got a few incidents there where I in the end clashed a lot with the partners of the business with my views on things compared to theirs.

Tamara:
Your values.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. So then we went for our separate ways. So I did that and because at the time I had an advanced diploma, so I had my RG146, which is your financial planning license that you have to keep and maintain and you have a certain amount of hours you got to do to keep that each year and so on and so forth. But when I got out of that, I went and traveled for about 18 months, so I just went all around through Asia and everything like that, which was fucking epic.

Tamara:
Got to do it.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, it was great.

Robbie:
[crosstalk 00:05:15] Surfing trip? You're a mad surfer, aren't you?

Dane Roche:
Yeah. So I started off, it was going to be a three week trip.

Tamara:
Going to be.

Dane Roche:
So I flew over to Bali for three weeks and then I came home a bit over a year later, so when I...

Tamara:
Three weeks turned into a year, nice.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so I traveled all through India, I went through Bangladesh, Malaysia, Thailand, Japan, because as you were traveling around...

Tamara:
Awesome.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, and I just seemed to have a lot of flow of mates at the time that were just kind of dropping in and out of locations, like a mate would go like, "I'm going to Japan, what are you up to?" I'm like [crosstalk 00:05:43].

Robbie:
How old were you at this stage?

Dane Roche:
So I was about 20, what was I at? 23 I think, round about there.

Robbie:
So pre-military.

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Robbie:
Hadn't joined yet.

Dane Roche:
Hadn't joined.

Robbie:
Fuck, you would've really spread your wings properly, because when you're traveling on your own, you spend a fair bit of time by yourself. You meet a heap of people at the bar. But I guess you would've already started to show some levels of resilience and resourcefulness to just make a two week trip turn into a whole year, that's pretty epic, mate.

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Tamara:
I love traveling and I so think that people, especially when they're young, get that life experience out of your way because you grow so much as a person. You absolutely learn lifelong lessons while you're traveling.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, and it was an itch I had to scratch I think, and I learned a lot about myself when I did that and it was good to pull myself out of quite a, I guess high level tempo situation, which was my job, and then be able to go, "Man, I fucking like it here. I might just stay for a week." You know what I mean? I just had that stuff where I wasn't jumping to someone else's skipping rope. From there when I got back, I decided I wanted to transition my advanced diploma into a degree, so I went and did a business management degree. I lived over in the States as well, I did a student exchange. If you had over a certain GPA, you could apply for a grant for a group of universities, so I just went to the university up here at Parkland, just up in the Gold Coast.

Tamara:
Cool.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so I did that, went over, went to the university [crosstalk 00:07:03].

Dan:
So you can keep surfing?

Dane Roche:
Yeah, fucking epic and...

Tamara:
It all comes back to, "Where can I surf?"

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Dan:
Well, it's a good work-life balance being able to have that involved, so that's good.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, it was crazy. So I did that, went over, so I was at the University of Miami, so I lived on campus and I met epic people over there.

Tamara:
Miami, gosh.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, it was great and I've got a ton of stories from that experience.

Dan:
I was going to say.

Tamara:
I bet.

Dan:
You're a fucking true Aussie ocker bloke, and they would've loved you over there.

Tamara:
Yeah.

Dane Roche:
It's full of Spanish women, you know what I mean?

Tamara:
Look out.

Dane Roche:
I remember the first one I met...

Dan:
This is MA, but we're not going down that route.

Dane Roche:
I remember the first guy I met, his name was Dana, and he actually reads the news over there for Key West now, and we became like that, so Dana and Dane, right? And his mom was German. So I went to theirs for 4th of July and all that sort of stuff, they really took me in, because he was half... When you get really American people, all they care about is fucking America, right? And they just go, "Oh, we're the best."

Tamara:
"'Merica."

Dane Roche:
Yeah, they don't have passports or anything like that. But because I hung out with him a lot, she had immigrated over, so she knew the world was a bigger place. So I remember the first party I went to with him, so I get there and it's all these dudes, and I'm like, "Fucking hell, man, this is a bit of a sausage sizzle." And then he goes, "Just wait for it, dude, just wait." I'm like, "All right, man." So there having a few beers and then about an hour later it was just wall to wall with Cuban women and I was like, "Man, America is a pretty awesome place."

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so I was over there, got back, worked for a little bit doing some consulting stuff when I got back, finished my degree, did that. And my brother-in-law was actually in the RAAF. So I've got three sisters, my oldest one, he's an [inaudible 00:08:41], so he's a flight sergeant. He's out now, think he got to warrants and then got out, but he used to send me pictures of him drinking a beer and it'd be like a fucking Monday at 9:00 am. And I used to think, "Oh, government workers, mate." And I thought maybe he's on to something, because he didn't feel anything when he went through the GFC, where everyone was going like...

Dan:
You were working in the financial industry during the GFC.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, and that was really hectic, really hectic.

Robbie:
So what years are we talking about now, just to sort of position everyone from a chronological perspective?

Dane Roche:
So I'm coming into probably... So I joined in 2012, so I'm probably like 28 at the time. So I'm joining at 28, or 27, sorry. So I went and had a YOU session down here at the Gold Coast, went through that, and I didn't know the difference between officers and airmen, or anything like that. Wasn't really told to me in DFR. Once I got in I realized there's quite a big difference. So I joined the RAAF, and I loved it, it was a great experience. It was a bit of a thing I guess, I always liked planes and stuff when I was a kid. And I always felt that the time felt right for me to go and do that.

Robbie:
Let me just explore something quickly, because having done a year down at Kapooka as a recruit instructor and then three years at Duntroon where I met Dan as a leadership instructor there, as an instructor I loved having a mature RAAF recruit. Just give our listeners and watchers a bit of an insight into what was it like going through recruit training.

Tamara:
You're not a 17 year old.

Dane Roche:
No.

Robbie:
But you're surrounded by a 17, 18, 19 year olds. I was 17 years one month and 23 days when I fucking joined so I still remember then.

Dan:
Is that just an approximate, mate, or?

Robbie:
Yeah, something like that, I'm not sure how many hours it was. But it would have been a fascinating and an unusual experience to be surrounded by young men and women and going through basic training, but you're like 10 years older than them.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, yeah.

Tamara:
Not only that, you've got that life experience that a lot of them wouldn't have from these traveling experiences, from your financial experience, your previous work experience, some of those people have never had a job before.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so when I went; and I had really good advice when I went, I remember, because my brother-in-law called me. So Baz calls me up and goes, "When you get there, mate, don't be first, don't be last, never answer a question, don't let them know your name." So I was just like, I was always in the middle.

Robbie:
It's like fucking resistance to interrogation.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. I was just always in the middle of the gaggle. But after a while, then after two weeks they were like, "No, mate, you're course orderly," so then I was always front and center, wearing it for everyone else, it was fucking [crosstalk 00:11:13].

Robbie:
That's good.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so it was a big shock to me I guess, because I was quite older going in, I was probably older than some of the MSIs that were smashing me, but I thought...

Tamara:
What's that? MSI.

Dane Roche:
Military Skills Instructor.

Tamara:
Okay.

Dane Roche:
So the instructors, same sort of thing. So I went...

Dan:
Except in the RAAF.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, I tried a lot of things and I would get the group in trouble. So I remember these quick changes and I used to think to myself, "Mate, I'm going to think something around this." So I get back from PET and I have a quick change, they give us 30 seconds, no one's going to get changed in that, so I just throw my cams over the top. Standing at the front, got this MSI walking down the hall, and he stops, he comes back. Because you wear a blue shirt, a really light blue shirt, it's underneath your green, because you wear greens back then, the blues hadn't come in yet. And he walks past and he pulls my shirt down, sees the blue and he goes, "Oh, surprise surprise, ACR Roche has tried to outsmart us again." So I was always getting smashed but I was always trying to think of the smarter way to do things, that's what I took it as.

Robbie:
I'm loving hearing... For the record, I'm hearing this story for the first time.

Tamara:
Yeah, we've never heard this.

Robbie:
This is gold, so we're going to come back to this shortly about when you started with us. So please continue on.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so I had that, so I joined as an avionics tech at the start. I had only changed the batteries in my remote for my TV, so I knew absolutely fuck all about electronics. But I learnt a lot, I studied a lot when I went through [SCT 00:12:30]. But as I got into it, I realized, "Man, I'm degree qualified, I guess my academic aptitude is really more geared towards being an officer." So I applied, you have to do three PARs, so you have to wait three years and then I commissioned from there. So I went through. So when I did that, when I first started I was married. So I went through a divorce as well while I was in the RAAF, which there's plenty of guys in the RAAF that go through that sort of stuff.

Dan:
And yeah, I mean it's [inaudible 00:12:57] for warrant officer.

Robbie:
Correct, you beat me to the bunch there, love it.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so at the time, my ex and my daughter, [Piper 00:13:05], they moved down the Gold Coast, so they're actually down at Pottsville, so not that far from here. So when that happened, I was really fortunate that I stayed at Amberley a long time. So especially when I started at Axon, the boys talk about all their postings, I always used to shut up because I'm like, "Oh, yes, it's terrible." But deep down I'm like, "I just spent like eight and a half years at Amberley then that was it." So I had a conversation with the streamer just about getting a back-to-back, and he said, "Oh, let me have a look," and he looked down through and obviously I'm just like, "Amberley, course, Amberley, Amberley, course," you know what I mean? Always comes back...

Robbie:
I get a sense, just quickly, that you're about to transition into how you found the ad for AXON?

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Robbie:
Right, perfect.

Dane Roche:
100%, so that was the writing on the wall was coming along. So I called him up and said, "What about going across into 35, one of the flying squadrons?" [inaudible 00:13:48], a training prep squadron at the time, a "Race, train, sustain" sort of stuff. So where we would get people to go across over to [inaudible 00:13:55], so they do six month rotations in the RAAF and they just man the base there. I would give all the briefs before they'd go, so all your [DOHAS 00:14:02] and [HPASS 00:14:02], all that stuff, anything that is about someones hip pocket, they will fucking get a book out and they will start writing notes. You talk about anything else, they all just look around, when they want to go on break. So I did that and then I tried to hit them up to see if I'd go across to a flying squadron, and they said, "You've been on base a while," and I knew, even though he didn't say it to me then, I knew my time was...

Tamara:
Coming.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so it's 2021 now, at the end of this year I would have been posted. And because I would have been posted, I didn't want to be the father who was far away. And that is one where I started going, "Oh shit, all right, what am I going to do?" And I thought, "Well, I can go get my financial planning license and I have to go back and get re-registered and all that sort of stuff," and I was swaying around a bit of what I wanted to do at the time. And then I was laying on the couch and I was sitting there and I never look at Seek, it was probably the first time I looked at Seek in nine years. I typed in the Gold Coast because I'm like, "All right, the first thing is my location," that's the thing where I got to go, because if I want to be present, I need to be close to her.

Tamara:
Two things, father and surf.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, I'm a avid surfer as well.

Robbie:
[crosstalk 00:15:01]. Always helps.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. And literally, I didn't have anything writing in the description, just the location. So I'm just there and it's like fucking, "Want to work and serve beers? You want to do that?" So I was like, "Oh, man."

Robbie:
You were just scrolling slowly with your finger.

Dane Roche:
I was just scrolling through and I was kind of half sort of talking to Jess at the same time, watching TV, it was a really just nonchalant. And then it goes past and it had, I can't fully recall, but I swear it had veteran there.

Tamara:
Yeah, it said "Property specialist, would suit ADF experience or veteran."

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so I was scrolling and I stopped, and I was like, "What the fuck?" And I went back, I started reading this. Yeah.

Dan:
Like ambiently scrolling through so much that you're like, "And that's shit, and that's shit, ooh, hang on here..."

Dane Roche:
Yeah, "And this is shit, and no I'm not a chiropractor, no I'm not, and I'm not a doctor," I'm just scrolling through. And I saw some finance stuff, I was like, "I think I'm going to have to go back and get my skills back up." And I stopped and I was looking at this and the ad, the way it was written was very different to the other stuff. The other stuff is very like, "This is our business," and these fonts and it comes down, "These will be your key responsibilities," and fucking blah, blah, blah. Whereas this one was just like, everything it was saying, it looked a lot more like someone who wrote it cared a lot about who they were going to get. A lot of stuff that they wrote in there was like, "This is not your normal job."

Tamara:
Well, that's good because we do.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, that's what I mean. But it just didn't have that sterile...

Dan:
Correct.

Dane Roche:
That corporate sterile advertisement sort of style.

Dan:
It was a very different application to be able to actually to read it. It basically says, "Don't apply if you're like this, don't apply if you..." Trying to filter out people who wouldn't fit with those values that we spoke about.

Robbie:
Yeah, this is not a nine to five job. This is a lifestyle.

Dane Roche:
Yep. Stuff about investing in property and stuff like that, which I had already done a lot of. And as I was going through I was just like, "That's me. That's me. That's me. That's me. Yep, yep, yep, yep, yep." And then I was there, and it was pretty late at night at the time, and I ran in and I showed it to Jess, I was like, "Fuck, check this out." And she's looking at it, I'm like, "I'm applying for this." And she goes, "Oh, are you doing it tomorrow?" Because it's like... "I'm fucking doing it now." So I ran down and I started getting it all and shot it off because I was like, "If anything's worth doing, you do it fucking now." Get it done, right? Or else all I know is there's somebody else or I get it in and it's too late or whatever it is. So I was like, "I'll get onto it." So I smashed it through and the next day I get a missed call from...

Robbie:
A number.

Dane Roche:
A number, who leaves a quick voicemail and because I missed it, and you're in that thing where you're like, "Oh, are they formal?" so I ring back and I miss...

Dan:
Despite what the ad looked like.

Dane Roche:
I know.

Dan:
You're like, "Now I need to be formal." [crosstalk 00:17:33].

Dane Roche:
But I left this corny, corny, voicemail, I was like, "Hello, Mr. Turner, it's..." And just...

Tamara:
This haunts you to this day.

Dane Roche:
Oh, I know, because I know him so well now, I just think, "Fucking hell, he's not Mr. Turner." So anyway, I did that.

Robbie:
I think guess a compliment, I think?

Dan:
Yeah.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. So did that, left him a voicemail, and he calls me back and we finally get to talk. And as soon as I started talking to Robbie, I knew he was someone I'd never met before. The way he spoke to me on the phone, just the energy he exubed over the phone... I don't even know if that's a word. Exubed, Dan? Put for whatever, exuberance?

Dan:
Mate, you're the one with the degree apparently.

Dane Roche:
Apparently, it's a long time ago now, it's getting a bit rusty. Yeah, so the way he spoke to me and he said, "Look, I'll be brutally honest with you mate, there were nine applications and I'm not ringing nine people." And I was like, "All right, cool, cool, cool." So he goes, "I'm going to have this other guy call you, Dane," I was like, "Oh, sweet." So I got off, and it was a good conversation, Robbie spoke to me about how I felt about when I looked down the ad, talked about my experiences and so on and so forth. And that was pretty much my introduction at the start, I was just like, "Fuck, this is great," and I think it came from left field to me, it was very... Get to know stuff really, really, fast about it.

Tamara:
And from my perspective, so I think I jumped on the second call after you had spoken to Dan.

Robbie:
We were in the car together.

Tamara:
And then Robbie and I called you back and had another chat and "When can we meet up," and that kind of thing. And from my perspective, the recruitment for you kind of went on a little longer than it probably should have, and it kind of makes me laugh now, because there was a few back and forths, "Let's meet up here, let's have this Zoom call, come in and watch a Facebook Live." There were so many touch points with you and I remember saying to Robbie, "So when's he starting? Have you offered him this job?" And you had kind of said, "Oh, he's waiting for his notice from Defense, he's waiting for Defense to get back to him on a few things." And I remember there was just this weird holding pattern and I remember you telling me your side there, Dane.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, yeah. And we did, we had a lot of touch points. And I realize now looking back why Robbie was doing it, it's just he really wants to get to know you before he lets you through the gate, right? Because it's his business and your business as well, right?

Robbie:
As we sort of spoke about at the end of the last session is that the people that we had recruited so far, they were all known entities. The ice was broken, I knew who they were already. So we needed to do slow is smooth, smooth is fast. I mean Dean, I put it across to you, because you guys were just supposed to have a quick little five minute chat. How did that, it's like you're my right hand man, nothing happens in the business without concurrence with you and Tamara, so I went, "Mate, I get good vibes from this dude, but ultimately you need to be the same way."

Dan:
Yeah, I'm horrendous for doing this to Anne, so it should be no surprise, where I'll say, "I'm just going to go and make a five minute call, and then I'll be back out to look after the kids."

Robbie:
Guilty.

Dan:
And I think I disappeared in my office and I sort of put the phone on and put the charger in and got ready to have a chat with Dane and I probably had three or four questions that I actually wanted to ask him, like what's your biggest failure in property, all that sort of stuff, and really start to get to know him a bit better. I think probably 45 minutes later I ended up walking out of there.

Tamara:
Well, this is also why we had to extend the discovery calls for you guys because it used to be a quick 10 minute call and then a quick 20 minute call, and then...

Dan:
Lucky to be done by 30, [crosstalk 00:21:10].

Robbie:
Even the 20s hard to get there. We got the 20 [crosstalk 00:21:12].

Dan:
But it's good, because we're filtering out people that are not a fit. I'd rather we say no or they say no sooner rather than later as opposed to waiting two and then the rest of it.

Robbie:
Do you remember much about that first call, Dane?

Dane Roche:
Man, I remember the first thing you said to me is like, "Hey, mate, just wanted to call you for a quick five minute chat." And it went for 45 minutes. And we spoke about heaps of things, because I asked you a lot of questions too, I think so. Like you said, you had a standard few questions through there, and I was asked them, because I was trying to learn about you guys as well.

Tamara:
Well, you were trying to work out what we actually did.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, at the start.

Tamara:
Because you're like, "Okay, I've read this job application that says we do this, this and this."

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Tamara:
But you're like, "But how does this is all work?"

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so we had a lot of sort of touch points then and then Robbie sort of messaged me, he said, "Mate, we're doing a Live event, make sure you get on there and watch it." He said, "You'll gain a heap of clarity about us." And I didn't have Facebook at the time because I deactivated, and I was like, "Fuck, I've got to get Facebook to watch this thing." So I went and got all that and I when I watched it, I learnt a lot from that. I remember Robbie bringing people in, he dropped the F bomb a few times, I was like, "Man, this guy's just a normal dude. This is great." So I really got that. But with I guess the dance at the start where we were talking a lot, Jess started going to me like, "What's going on? Is this a job, or are you just..." Like, "Who are you hanging with?"

Tamara:
"Are you sneaking around?"

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Dan:
In the friend zone.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. And that's when I started going like, "Maybe he just wants to be my mate."

Tamara:
"I'm just going to hang out with this guy, I don't actually have a job." [crosstalk 00:22:41].

Robbie:
For the record, I've got fucking so many mates that I don't talk to every now and then, I do not need any more friends, I assure you.

Dane Roche:
That hurts.

Dan:
So what was the actual process? So the first point of call, you submitted your resume and your application to Tammy. Then you got a phone call from Robbie.

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Dan:
Then we had a call.

Dane Roche:
Then we had a chat. Then I had another...

Tamara:
Then we had another call.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, then I had another call with them and then I had the potential...

Dan:
And then we were going to do the face-to-face meet up.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so we were going to have a face-to-face at a a café but you guys couldn't get up to Brisbane.

Robbie:
Yeah, that's right.

Dan:
The road was flooded.

Dane Roche:
The road, yeah, so we canned that, so that one didn't happen, then I think I might have had another phone call with RT, and then a couple text messages going across, and he said, "Make sure you watch the live," so I got on and watched that, then he was hitting me up after that, so it was quite a long, and we were just touching base regularly.

Dan:
Then the next one I remember.

Dane Roche:
Was the Zoom.

Dan:
We did the Zoom. And then after the Zoom, then you were invited to come down to the office and actually meet us face-to-face, which we were trying to do.

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Dan:
What was your first impressions when you popped into our awesome office, that we spoke about in the last episode, but what was your first impressions when you turned up?

Dane Roche:
Well, I got in and there wasn't too many people in front of me, I was like... And someone goes, can't remember who it was, I think it might have been Tamara, going, "OH, The boys are filming. I'll just bring you in." And I got in and you two were talking and I remember thinking, "Man, Robbie looks a lot shorter than when I seen him on all the recordings."

Tamara:
Was Dan wearing shoes?

Dane Roche:
No.

Tamara:
No.

Dane Roche:
The boys had shorts on.

Tamara:
He never records in shoes for some reason. Well, there was a time I had to encourage him to wear shoes at all in the office.

Dan:
Well, we were working in a home office environment.

Tamara:
But I still haven't broken the recording in shoes. Recording, you still get your leave pass there with the shoes.

Dan:
Tammy, all I'm doing is making your husband feel better because if I wore shoes, then everyone would know that he's a little bit shorter than me.

Tamara:
Oh, that's what it is.

Robbie:
My excuse is that we can feel the carpet, we can feel the rug, and we can feel the tape on the floor so we know where to stand.

Dan:
Yeah, there's no end of reasons why we have to have no shoes on.

Tamara:
There's always a reason.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so I got in, that was my first thing, and I sort of sat back and I watched it, and met the other boys, the other property specialists, got around to saying g'day to me, and then we went to an office, I think the one where I sit now actually, and we had a discussion there. And that's where it was more sort of the metal hitting the meat from that perspective, where Robbie talked about all the transitioning all that sort of stuff and where you've got to do your stuff, get that sorted, and we'll receive you when you're ready.

Robbie:
I remember one of the really great conversations we had, all the fluff had been gone, you're a good dude, lets now talk turkey. How is this actually going to work? And what were the main things that you and I were discussing in the name of you being able to successfully transition and not just get out of the military and have it fail, quite frankly?

Dane Roche:
Well, I had a lot of... Obviously I didn't have the leave, because I hadn't ticked over my 10 years, so I actually went down the leave without pay path, so I had six months without, so I kind of kept my foot in that thing. Just because I still was very guarded, I guess, going into that. I had a lot of conversations like, "What qualifications do people have there?" Like, are you guys brokers? So I had a lot of that sort of stuff [inaudible 00:25:54]. He also had something which I always felt a lot more confident about. The one thing I spoke about too, was ethics, it was a big one with me, where I spoke to you guys about that.

Tamara:
That's huge, and that comes down to the values that we spoke about, but being ethical and not pushing a property down someone's throat, especially if it's not the right fit for someone. I know that was hugely important to you.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, yeah, definitely. So I think when I spoke to Robbie, and I think it was Dan as well... I might have touched on it on the Zoom call I think, at the back end of that. You were like, "What questions of us do you have?" And I said, "Well, I just don't want to be in a position where we're doing something unethical." If that's something, I don't want to be a part of it.

Robbie:
Based on your previous experiences in the industry.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, yeah. So when I was a financial advisor, so like I said I had a really good wrap under dad with the way it was all tailored and it was very much you're doing it for the client. In the corporations act, it also states that financial advisor must do their upmost in the best interest of the client. But then when I went across to LOK Walkers, it was very much based on; I don't know if I've ever told you how they actually did it, which ended up being quite frictionous with me. So where's a good pool of money? A lot of people have it, it's in their super, right? People don't sit there and stare at their super transaction account all the time. People will look at their bank account, "Oh, what's this? I got a toll charge on here, I don't remember going to that toll." They look over it like a [inaudible 00:27:22], but no-one ever really looks at that.

Dane Roche:
So a lot of the stuff that was sort of burning through that that I didn't really like is that one thing that is a recurring payment is insurance, right? Insurance comes out as a premium, comes over and over and over. A lot of people can get their insurance through, there's certain [inaudible 00:27:37] your TPD and your death benefit are usually tied to your superannuation, but then you can get income and other insurances as well. If you purchase them within your superannuation, they are not a tax deduction, so they carry the 15 cents tax. But if you pay for it out of your own salary, it's a tax deduction, it's a write-off, right? So you're going to get the tax back. So for certain people that, depending where they are on their pay scale, I think it's in the better interest for some people to be paying for it out of their income because they're technically going to get their 45 cents to the dollar back, right?

Robbie:
As you'd expect, everyone's different.

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Robbie:
It's the reason why we don't just wave the magic wand over every client and go, "All right, there you just go apply this cookie cutter solution to your circumstances." It's got to be tailored.

Tamara:
No, you have to have a plan around their goals, their future life, their family, their goals, all of that.

Dane Roche:
So what they would do is, these guys would push people, they'd say, "Oh, you pay for it out of your super so you don't have to worry about it." And a lot of people are like, "Oh yeah yeah, cool, that makes sense." So once they do that, they also have, it's called a clawback or a trail commission loan. They had that linked to that insurance benefit that's going through there. So these guys are getting cash for a service they provided four or five years ago. And that's a recurring payment. And I didn't like that because I'm like, "Well, in the end it's not the best for the client." One of the greatest things you can learn is tax minimization. You want to learn about getting more money, work out the tax system, right? So I was like, "Well for these clients, it's better that they'll be paying it out of that." But they're like, "Oh no no, we want to keep it in there." And the reason why was not for the client, it's for them, because they want to keep getting those recurring benefits.

Dane Roche:
Another thing; so that was going on, and I was like, "I didn't get a good vibe from that," and the other thing was when we started going through the GFC, [inaudible 00:29:23] there was a company called ABC Learning. So ABC Learning was a childcare center, one of the fastest growing companies that had even seen, and people were loving it. It was fucking fantastic.

Robbie:
Yeah, everyone listening now should be nodding their head going, "I've seen ABC Learning."

Dane Roche:
Yeah. Yeah.

Tamara:
Yeah.

Dane Roche:
Goodstart ended up buying the shell company. Anyway, they originated in Australia, they went to the UK, US, and New Zealand. They held a quarter of all childcare centers in those regions. What they were doing, though, in their finances, they would talk about intangible assets. So when you're going down through an accounting structure, reporting is all different depending, right? Axon has a quantitative value, just Axon itself, the brand, right? So they talk about goodwill and so on and so forth, but they were inflating these things. They were buying things so fast it was almost convoluting the finances, so it looked like they were going really well, but they actually didn't have the cashflow to start actually affording the stuff they were doing. But they were growing too fast than they could afford.

Tamara:
It was all in a line of credit or something.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. Yeah. And they were fixing this, but a lot of it, because it was the largest public listed company in childcare centers, a lot of the money was coming from investors, because they're like, "Oh, that's fucking great. I want to put my money in there." So they're like, "Yeah, sweet," taking the investors' money, and then they weren't managing it correctly. Anyway, it started to go a bit haywire, and I sort of pushed against. So we had a lead financial planner, I guess, which is like your manager or like how Dan is with the coaches, sort of thing. Then you'd have guys underneath and so you'd have stocks insurance, property, or whatever it is. So you kind of specialize.

Robbie:
All the different asset classes that you can...

Dane Roche:
Yeah, 100%. So when that started happening, I was like, "Man, I'm not getting a good vibe from this. I think we should pull everyone's money out, who are in it, while it's still worth something." He's like, "No, no, no." And I was just like, "Mate, the writing's on the wall, pull it out." And then he didn't, and then it went bust. So if you had ABC Learning, you lost everything.

Tamara:
Wow.

Dane Roche:
And I think that was when I sort of said, "I need a break." So I ejected out of that at that point, because it was there and we could have saved them and we chose not to.

Tamara:
And I guess what you're saying there is, you chose to speak up on something that you believed in and something that was the best interest for the clients, and you didn't feel like you were heard.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, yeah. So that was it.

Robbie:
How long after joining Axon; I'm really fascinated by this story, by the way; how long after joining Axon did you realize that that wasn't the case here?

Dane Roche:
Once I hit up Robbie about that; and I didn't lead, say to him like, "Oh, this is my experience in the past," I said, "I just want to be in an ethical..."

Robbie:
[crosstalk 00:32:04]. Because again, I'm hearing this for the first time. It's great.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. And there's been a few things. I remember one where someone had quite a lot of funds post their investment, and even though we have a mortgage broker who works really close to us, there's no commercial relationship or anything like that, but mortgage brokers will get paid based off the balance that sits in the offset account, right? Off the mortgage.

Tamara:
The loan. Yeah.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. So the best advice for the client would be that your funds would go in there, which is not the best for the mortgage brokers, because they'll get more money. And I remember Robbie just saying, "We will always do what's the best for the client." So even though it's not the best for them, it's in the best interest of the client. And then there was a few, I guess, people progressing down the road to acquiring a property where they had erroneous spending. That was another one where the boys turned and pulled it and said, "Nah, mate, your money is not in check." And another one, Robbie said, I guess, "No-one is above what we're about. So we're not going to sacrifice our own values for the sake of making a few bucks."

Tamara:
Absolutely.

Dane Roche:
And I've seen him do that. And all three of you, actually, I've seen you guys do that repeatedly throughout my time... And that's why I fucking love working there, because I feel like the soul of it behind it is for good. And I was saying to Dan the other day, so we spoke on Sunday and I was like, "Mate, I believe..."

Dan:
That's what we do on weekends. [crosstalk 00:33:28] We chat to each other.

Tamara:
You talk work?

Dan:
On Valentine's day. Dane and I are just having a chit...

Tamara:
Oh bless.

Dane Roche:
"Hey Valentine, what are you up to?"

Robbie:
It used to be you and I, now it's you and Dane.

Dan:
I think I might have got that message from you, "Hey Valentine."

Dane Roche:
And I was just talking to him, was just saying that I believe defense members have a certain competitive advantage over every other person out there, because they do have subsidized rent, they're very geared towards one asset class. Like they're not going and getting HPASS to go into the AXS and purchase fucking Commonwealth Bank stocks. So I think when you know it's the best for the client, it doesn't feel like, for me... I get a bit perplexed actually sometimes when people don't take up our services, because I think, "Well, what are you going to fucking do, mate?" Like I'd love to know what you're doing, let me know, so I can do it too if it's going to get us to the...

Robbie:
I love that part of the conversation. It's normally when family and friends get involved, they're like, "Oh, I wouldn't do that of you," and I don't know, as you had a couple of months of coaching under your belt now and there's been a couple of curly ones come your way, where family and friends think they know better. I just sit back and go, "You know what? I'm cool." If you don't want to do this and you want to take the advice of your family and friends, no dramas, but you've come to us and said here's your end state, here's your goals. What's the plan, champion? If you don't want to create wealth in your life using a property asset class and you're not a shares guy and you don't know what to do, but you want to take the advice of your family and friends, how the fuck are you going to get from point A to point B?

Tamara:
And we've kind of touched on it before...

Robbie:
And just sit back and just shut up and just, "Oh, oh, yeah, yeah." Okay. No dramas, champ. Off you go. You go fucking do that then.

Dan:
[crosstalk 00:35:01].

Tamara:
We've kind of touched on it before as like, the experiences of our parents and the more senior generations, we don't have the same property experiences that they do. My dad bought his first property for $120,000, and then a few years later sold it for, I don't know, $350,000, and then bought somewhere else for $300,000 and then sold that for another $700,000 or something; because this is all in Sydney, which has absolutely boomed. And now there's just not that kind of experience for this generation. You don't sit there and pay off your own home and expect to make that kind of money.

Robbie:
My parents would shit themselves... They probably wouldn't be listening to a podcast, my mum wouldn't even know what a podcast is. Love you, Mum. But they would shit themselves if they knew I was in a couple of million dollars of good debt. Because fucking there's debt and there's just debt. There's just no difference.

Dan:
Just a different mindset.

Robbie:
Yeah.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. Yeah, it is.

Dan:
The axons firing in the brain.

Tamara:
But saying that, that's the difference between listening to your parents or listening to people who are doing it every single day. Just because their parents made a whole load of money in the property market by buying their own home and paying it off, you can't listen to them if they haven't got their own portfolio, their own investments, they haven't done things in a measured way rather than just relying on the things that happened.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. They were very fortunate to buy when they did, a lot of people. You talk about the baby boomers, you could go down to Palm Beach, you could buy a house on the beach for $130 grand.

Robbie:
I call them accidental millionaires.

Tamara:
Yeah. [crosstalk 00:36:41].

Dane Roche:
I always say they're asset rich, cash poor.

Robbie:
But all their money's in their house. That's exactly right. [crosstalk 00:36:45]. It's a big fucking deal.

Dane Roche:
They got this banging old beach shack that they bought for nothing and they're down at the Centrelink dole line.

Robbie:
You still need to be able to borrow against the equity and demonstrate to the banks that someone's going to pay it back one day.

Dane Roche:
And that you can service it. Yeah.

Tamara:
And where does your money come from when you retire, or you're no longer working? Where does your money come from?

Robbie:
Well, it's not true wealth. So wealth is having an asset spread effectively. And you can be rich for a day or wealthy for a lifetime. A lot of those people, they're hit in the arse by a rainbow effectively. They've got this thing, but if you said to them, "Go out and build yourself up..."

Dan:
"Go create it again."

Robbie:
Yeah, "Go build yourself a passive income stream," they'd be like, "Oh, fuck, I don't know."

Tamara:
"A what?"

Dan:
Well, let's talk about that for a second, because as you've just outlined over the last half an hour or so, you've spent many, many years working in the financial sector. And as the great Robert Kiyosaki speaks about, what is the definition of an asset? Now, homeowners fucking hate me when I have this conversation with them, because people are like, "Oh, I've bought my own home and it's going up in value," I'm like, "Yeah, cool, no dramas, but in the context of wealth creation using property, he defines an asset as something of value, got it, that provides an income. Now, does your own home take money from your bank account every month or put money in your bank account every month?"

Tamara:
Takes.

Dan:
The answer is the first one. Correct. So in fact, Mr. Homeowner, who doesn't want to fucking branch out and create that wealth in your life, you don't have a wealth creation plan, you're just stuck in a 30 year mortgage trap.

Tamara:
And it's crazy, we spoke to Jace about people relying on what they've got in their super, and no-one seems to have the right about of super for what we're going to retire on.

Dane Roche:
People are sitting in uni for twice as long as they should, and people taking ages to get their income up, and by the time they get there... That's why people will be working for a lot longer than traditionally. And I love, like you're saying that, Robbie, and what do that do with that income? That's what I mean, where you go in and I used to say, it's income producing asset, income producing asset. I sometimes talk to our clients now about it, income producing assets, I'm sitting there over the Zoom calls saying it to them.

Robbie:
It's like on repeat. It's like he's got it playing in the background.

Dane Roche:
Income producing assets forever.

Dan:
But here's the thing, they're hearing it for the first time because ladies and gents, fucking dial in and tell us otherwise, none of us were taught this at school.

Tamara:
I'll just get the radio hotline.

Dan:
Yeah, yeah, I feel like back in the 80s. You can be caller number five with the fucking switchboard I don't have in front of me. But it's true, if you've never heard of this concept before, don't feel silly, it's normal. If you haven't heard of these concepts then of course you're just going to do what your parents and friends say.

Robbie:
So let's wrap it up just quickly soon.

Dan:
Absolutely. Let's take that, Dane, obviously you've spoken about your strong background that you've had in the finance sector, you've done your military time, and now you've got your final posting to the Axon posting, obviously, and you're on transition mode. Tell us about when you actually turned up, day one, to start your business. How did the beginning of your time in Axon [crosstalk 00:39:39].

Dane Roche:
So I came in, ripe old time of 10 o'clock, that was my start time, I remember that. I was like, "Oh, that's pretty good." Got in and...

Dan:
We had something on that morning, so I didn't want Dane to turn up.

Robbie:
I was going to say, I'm like, "What the fuck, 10 o'clock?"

Dane Roche:
Yeah, I know. Because I was like, "Oh, when do you want me there? Eight o'clock?" And then Dan was like, "No, just come at 10:00." I was like, "Oh, sweet."

Tamara:
"Okay."

Dane Roche:
So anyway, I got in there and it was very much came in, met a few people at the start, sort of went around, and then I sat down. And it was very structured, which I liked, at the start. So I got all my logins and everything like that, and then I pretty much just concentrated on doing my course. And I know I was talking to Robbie a bit about that at the time, like Robbie was saying, "Oh, we'll expose you to the business," but I spoke to Dan, said, "I just want to focus on this, and let me get this done, and then I can inject, so I'm not just going from pillar to post and then my brain's just pulsating."

Tamara:
What was it that you said to him, Dan?

Dan:
Oh, probably just, "Do as you're told, and nothing more until you're told to do that."

Dane Roche:
Yeah.

Dan:
And I was like, "Keep your eyes and your ears open, close your mouth, and you'll be fine." It almost goes back to the recruit training, doesn't it, that's what I was [crosstalk 00:40:42].

Dane Roche:
And I did. So I just shut up for [crosstalk 00:40:43].

Dan:
Don't be last, don't be first, just be that guy in the middle. And now you've been with us basically since that, what was is, March 2020?

Dane Roche:
Yep. Yeah, absolutely.

Dan:
So you've been with us now for almost a year.

Tamara:
Well, there was a little incident day two actually, when you were with us day two.

Robbie:
Was that day two? I thought that's why he had to come in late on day one.

Tamara:
No.

Dane Roche:
No, no, I was there. Because I remember you were standing behind me talking about... So yeah, my second day, someone was released of their duties, I guess you could put it.

Tamara:
Released.

Dane Roche:
And they left at 9:30, and I remember at the time I was thinking, "Oh man," because I started at 10 o'clock the day before, someone was going home at 9:30, I was like...

Dan:
What do you mean, going home? What did they say?

Dane Roche:
Well, I said it to Robbie, and then Robbie's like, "No, that's a permanent [EKO 00:41:26]." Because I was like, "Oh, is that EKO?" He was like, "That's permanent."

Dan:
What did she walk in and say?

Dane Roche:
She was saying goodbye to everyone. And she was really happy when she walked... So she came in, you guys took her in and counseled her for the release, and then when she came back she was so bubbly. So I didn't understand at the time, she came out and she was like, "Bye everyone, have a great weekend."

Tamara:
Oh my god, that imitation.

Dane Roche:
[crosstalk 00:41:48]. And I was just like, "What the fuck?" And then Robbie came out, I'm like, "Oh, EKO?" And he goes...

Tamara:
You don't want that EKO.

Dane Roche:
"You don't want that EKO, mate." And then I realized, it dawned on me because they all went to the lunch room and people were like, "Oh, she got sacked." And I was like, "Oh, fuck. Thank God..."

Tamara:
As I said earlier, that is the hardest part of our business, but it does really all come down to our values. And if people are not aligned, then why would we keep someone, not just for us, but we're holding someone back from living their true purpose or living their best life, living the reason that they should be out there doing their thing, we're holding them back because we're trying to push them into our mold. And she wasn't a fit, and we tried our best to motivate her and train her in our way, and she just wasn't a fit. And it was still early on, but it was just kind of unfortunate the timing of day 2. [crosstalk 00:42:46].

Robbie:
I was going to say, Dane, what were you thinking when you're like...

Dane Roche:
Shitting my pants after that.

Robbie:
"I've just left the military and now I've turned up and I've seen someone exit stage right."

Dane Roche:
When I saw that, and then I had a little discussion, I can't remember. I think it was Jane decided it wasn't a right fit [crosstalk 00:43:01].

Tamara:
Yeah, it wasn't a right fit, and she was still in probation.

Dane Roche:
And the boys had said to me the day before, "We understand, man, you come in, you've obviously got experiences before this, but just on receive, just shut up."

Dan:
And she was a veteran too, she'd been out of the military for a number of years, but she had 10 or so years under her belt. So that's part of the reason why she came in. But I guess we didn't do that on purpose, but what you would have realized, no doubt, is that this shit is real.

Dane Roche:
Yeah. Like in the RAFF, it's near impossible to get people out. Like you're there doing records of conversations, and the process is worse than actually just dealing with the dickhead. So you end up just putting him in a corner or you move him to a different section of whatever you've got to do to just get them out of your face. But when I saw that I was like, "Man, this is real deal." Your output is linked to the success of the business. So after that, I was very much just head down, bum up, study...

Tamara:
I think we hardly heard from you. I think you hardly actually said two words for a good...

Dane Roche:
I would ask 50 questions to Dan so many times after a call.

Dan:
Well, we heard from him a whole lot less later, because eight days later a small little thing happened.

Tamara:
A small...

Dan:
A little, international incident called COVID. Like a worldwide pandemic kicked into gear.

Robbie:
So you're literally drinking from the fire hose, and then you're like, "Holy shit," eight days later, Tammy, we spoke with one of our HR lawyers and we're like, "Okay, we need to send everyone home."

Tamara:
No, it was a national briefing from the Prime Minister, "Everyone stay at home, you are not to go to work." And thankfully we'd already been using all of the things for remote...

Robbie:
Technology.

Tamara:
Technology, Zoom calls, things like that. But we were really not prepared for the HR side of things. We've been such a close team, and working together every day, and then suddenly we've got to train new team members remotely.

Dane Roche:
And I got to grace the great Dan Irwin's house, which was great.

Dan:
Well, mate, obviously in a new role you need to be trained up along the way. And I remember [Simo 00:45:07] was actually over in New Zealand at the time, and he was extremely sick. He didn't have the COVID, but he was bedridden over there, because he was meant to come back and actually be training Dane full time from that perspective. But he was gone, so I'm like, "Dane, just come round my place, we'll have coffee and banana bread, it'll be amazing."

Dane Roche:
It was awesome. Yeah. Your wife is a top notch cook.

Tamara:
God, Anne's banana bread, geez, it is well known, is Anne's banana bread.

Dan:
So Dane shows up and he actually brings his packed lunch, he'd been to the butcher down the road and everything, he doesn't realize...

Dane Roche:
Put it in the freezer.

Dan:
Yeah, "Put it in the freezer, you are not eating that, mate. You're going to be looked after in this house." But we did, we sat down in my home office there and we went from the ground up, and you got to just sit in there and immerse yourself over [crosstalk 00:45:47].

Dane Roche:
And I think it was really beneficial to me, because I know I was supposed to transition over to being trained by Simo at that point, but seeing the expectation of a coach, from watching Dan, Dan would be like, "This is what I expect," and seeing it from the top down really assisted me, because then I knew like, "He needs this, this, and this done. He needs this done, this is..."

Tamara:
It's the reasons why you do things, the bigger picture on how your little piece of the puzzle fits into the whole puzzle.

Dane Roche:
Yeah, so what can I do to make sure that he can do his job? What admin stuff can I pick up, you know what I mean? So it was good having that time there, and I actually miss going there, because after [crosstalk 00:46:24].

Tamara:
Because of the banana bread?

Dane Roche:
Yeah, and I was saying to Jess, I was like, "What's going on with the coffee machine? Is it broken or what's going on?"

Robbie:
I used to walk in home sometimes and I'd say to Tamara, I'm like, "Babe, what's that smell?" She's like, "What smell?" I'm like, "Exactly, where's my fucking dinner?"

Dane Roche:
I wasn't that crude.

Tamara:
And then he got a black eye for that.

Dan:
That's another story to talk about, his black eye though, right?

Robbie:
Yeah.

Tamara:
Which one?

Robbie:
Yeah, but as we sort of wrap up this episode now, it wasn't just you that was going through the training, there was Natalie who'd recently started, there was Nigel who'd recently started. So as we now transition into episode seven, it's all about how do we grow the team, how do we continue to have that professional output and that sort of service, all whilst working remotely?

Tamara:
How did we continue to grow the business while COVID was happening? That was a time when a lot of businesses failed, or they went under, they had to let go of a lot of people, and we were managing to grow. And so it's going to be great to just share some of the learnings that we took, and the stuff that we'd done beforehand to set these safety measures, I guess, in place. We were ready. We were ready.

Robbie:
Because as you may have all heard from the end of the previous episode, we more than doubled the amount of people we were able to help during this COVID period. So that's really exciting, and I can't wait to share with you how we made that happen.

Dan:
Yeah, it's going to be absolutely amazing to share with you how everything came from being the Axon you previously knew to the Axon you know and love now, with the addition of Dane and a few other key members in the team.

Robbie:
So as a quick little heads up, Dane's going to be joining us now pretty much all the time. Every now and then we'll have a little guest speaker come in, and one of us might drop in, drop out, but yeah, we've now got Dane, Dan, Tammy and myself, ready for the rest of Axon Unleashed. Let's do this.

Dan:
Awesome.

Robbie:
See you later.

Tamara:
See you soon.

Robbie:
Bye.

Dan:
Bye.

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