Axons Unleashed S1 E4: Why We Stopped Marketing to 99% of Australia

Axons are part of the neuro-transmission system in the brain… they carry the spark between the neurons to fire the body into action!

This podcast will get your Axons fired up by our hosts Robbie, Tamara, Dan and Dane as they uncover the untold truths of what it really takes to successfully transition from the ADF, how to build a multi-million-dollar property portfolio, how to start a business as a veteran entrepreneur and how to more effectively communicate with your partner… while optimising your personal performance in every aspect of your life.

In the 4th episode of the season, the team talks about finding our niche within the ADF community, and having the courage to completely commit and align to only that small section of the market, was a huge step for the business! And how making that decisive move allowed the business to grow faster than any other in the industry. 

Related: Episode 3: I Sacked My Wife From The Business, Then Had To Beg For Her Back

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Episode Transcription:

Robbie Turner:

It’s Robbie here from Axon Property Group and welcome to episode four of our brand new podcast called Axon’s Unleashed. I’m joined here by Dan and Tammy. How you going this morning team?

Tammy:
Good morning. We’re great. I’m great.

Dan:
Eight, 10. You’re great. I’m great. You’re great. Everyone’s great. What a good start to the day.

Robbie Turner:
I thought you were just looking around the room there and going, “Is there actually a clock in here, or are we in a some sort of casino?” There is behind my head.

Dan:
Yeah. Literally, if you turn around, there’s the world’s biggest clock behind you, so yes.

Tammy:
But it doesn’t tick though. It stays the same time.

Dan:
You can’t help the ticking noise, it’ll interrupt the [crosstalk 00:01:37].

Robbie Turner:
Welcome to episode four. So far, we’ve covered off on how the business Axon even started, why we started this podcast. What actually happens when Tinder gets involved in starting the business. We even last time, we spoke about why I sacked my wife and then begged her to come back, so that was really, really interesting stuff as well. And today, we’re going to talk about why we stopped marketing or why we stopped talking to 99% of Australians. So, here we go. A little bit more narrow and deep into the foundations of the business.

Dan:
So, we literally just started talking about how successful Tammy had been in finding the right people to speak to as we went through the whole growth of the business, and then turn around and go, “Actually, we only want to speak to 1% of those people.” [crosstalk 00:02:18]

Tammy:
So, at the time we had two markets. So, we had our ADF clientele, our ADF veterans defense community, and then we were also marketing to mom and dad investors, the normal civilian world, I guess. Just anyone that was interested in buying a house, buying a property, getting into property investment. So, we were competing against every other property investment company for that as well.

Robbie Turner:
Yeah. And then we started doing those discovery sessions, Dan, as we spoke about towards the end of episode three there. And we actually discovered that a lot of those people were not the right fit for us. They weren’t ready, they were at different stages of life. So, all the amazing hard work that the marketing crew were doing by getting to those people to do the discovery session, the transition into the coaching process just wasn’t quite working out. So we were like, “We need to find a better way.” So, I remember that tomorrow is about that stage that we were accepted into the coaching program of an amazing business mentorship, called The Entourage down in Sydney, run by the amazing and wonderful Jack Delosa. Hope you’re listening buddy. Catch up with you soon.

Dan:
No doubt. He’s probably like, “This is my new favorite podcast.”

Robbie Turner:
So, it’s one of the things that we learned very quickly in business, is the importance of coaching. So, we haven’t done an MBA. We’re literally running this business on the fly. We’re doing our MBA, whilst in fast forward motion. So, it’s almost like the same reason Dan, that you and I wrap up the end of all of our training series, is that don’t do this by yourself. If you weren’t taught this at school, and if you’re an expert firefighter, or a pilot, or a special forces guy or whatever it is that you do, then you just keep doing that. And if you want assistance in the property space, or if you want to make yourself better at anything really, you read any book about success and teamwork and being driven, they’ll be like, “Find a coach and find a team that can help you.”

Tammy:
If that was such a driving force for us telling our people, our clients, make sure you get coaching, then we weren’t listening to it ourselves. So, that was something that we really decided to take the reins on as well.

Dan:
So, you’d been exposed, I suppose, Robbie, from previous roles, you did get exposed to a few of these different business mentorship programs. And then eventually, you’ve decided let’s go all in. Let’s go and engage this other organization down there.

Robbie Turner:
Yeah. It was great.

Dan:
What was the first things first? You obviously needed to go down there and meet them and get engaged from that perspective.

Robbie Turner:
Yeah. So, because we had been part of some other business mentorship before, we entered at that medium to high level. We didn’t go into the grassroots level, because we’d been running for about a year or so by then.

Tammy:
We were no longer in the real basic startups, like how to set up things and the stuff that we probably should have learnt more of, but we fumbled our way through. But we were past that by the time we joined in and we wanted help on how to grow and scale measurably without too much risk, and just doing things in a sustainable way that wasn’t going to crash our business.

Robbie Turner:
So, we were really lucky that the mentorship program that we joined at, gave us access to a couple of those key advisors. So, we did a 90 minute session with Jack himself, and we’ll come back to that in a second, but we’re also one of the key advisors we’re like, “All right, cool. How can we now take our marketing and our messaging and our information that put across all the different social media channels, to the next stage?” So, we had a really great chat with the head of marketing down at The Entourage there. So, Tammy, you’re the marketing director. So, just let everyone know how that chat went, and what was the key outcome really?

Tammy:
Well, a lot of the initial conversation was around how do we get people to actually show up live to our different online training? Our Facebook Lives that we’re running. But when we started discussing that we had two markets, we essentially had that defense community, and we had our mum and dad investors. Then he gave us a strange look and said, “Okay. So, how much is this one marketing cost for you, and how much is this one?” And he’s like, “You realize that the mum and dad’s are costing you more because you’re fighting against every other property investment company in Australia? You’re going after the same target market. You’ve got such a niche market, you’ve got such a great connection to the defense community. Why are you not just going narrow and deep on your target market?” And we looked at each other like, “I don’t know.”

Robbie Turner:
Yeah. So, it’s almost like you Dan. He got out the white board, he goes, “Right. Why don’t we do this?” And he goes, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. He goes, “That’s the perfect messaging and marketing funnel to your avatar, smallest viable market.” He goes, “Give that a go. I guarantee you’re going to get much, much different results.” So, we were just like mic drop moment. Boom. This is so exciting.

Tammy:
It’s funny when someone from outside your business has one of those key points, and you sit there and go, “I don’t know why we don’t do it like that.” And there’s been a couple of things over the years that people from an outsider perspective will go, “Well, have you thought about doing it this way?” And you just look at yourselves and go, “What? Why did we not think of that?” It seems so obvious as soon as someone tells you that, but at the time, it wasn’t.

Robbie Turner:
But it was so counterintuitive because we’d turned our back on 99% of Australia. It was like, “We don’t want to talk to you. We don’t have this levels of relatability for you.”

Tammy:
I don’t think it’s, we don’t want to talk to you. We would definitely help anyone that was referred to us. Anyone that came our way, that had a connection with us that was aligned with us, aligned with what we’re doing. But essentially, we weren’t going to spend our marketing dollars finding those clients that weren’t our avatar. They weren’t our niche market. They weren’t the perfect target market for us.

Dan:
And then they would just get a special shout out to all of our much loved civilian clients out there. You know who you’re talking about, just to make sure everyone’s very aware. We do love you guys and love helping you out as well.

Tammy:
Absolutely. And especially when they’re aligned with us and they respect that the benefit, it is working with some of our veterans that we have in the business, that connection.

Robbie Turner:
You’re absolutely right because we still, what is it? Once every six months, we re-record our, not how to use your ADF housing entitlements, but it’s all about how to escape the 30 year mortgage trap. So, it’s very much a civilian-based thing there. Because Johnno, who’s a sniper up in one area says, “My sister, who’s a civilian nurse down in Sydney, wants some assistance.” Obviously, Johnno’s sister doesn’t care about HPAS and DHOAS, but she certainly would want to learn about how to use property a smart way.

Tammy:
That’s right.

Robbie Turner:
So, we don’t turn our back on those people. But we certainly focus our efforts at the front end towards speaking.

Dan:
But while, yes, we got put forward that this is a very niche market, that we’ve got high levels of relatability with, they come from our background and culture. We are those people, we’ve just transitioned out now. So, we’re a couple of steps ahead because everyone’s going to get out of the military eventually, right. But it’s a very, very protective community. If you step one foot out of line or do one thing wrong, everybody’s going to know about it. So, whilst you went narrow and deep, there was also a fair amount of risk involved with you turning directly towards the defense community.

Robbie Turner:
A very double-edged sword, I suppose, if we speak of it. Bad news travels real fast, and in the name of mateship and protecting your mates there from dealing with someone shonky, we certainly went all in from a reputation management perspective, and it’s something that we’re extremely proud of now. We just fast forward, even though we’ve been casting back a couple of years to give everyone a really solid foundation about how Axon started. The wonderful property coach, Dane, is going to join us in the next few episodes. And he recently was on a discovery call. The exact same business model which you guys just discovered during the last episode. One of the guys in there was like, “Before I go ahead with everyone, I’ve got a bit of a red flag.” He says, “Why don’t you have any bad online reviews?”

Tammy:
He said, “It comes across fake because you’ve got no bad reviews. You’ve only got good reviews on there, so it looks fake.”

Robbie Turner:
And Dane’s like, “All right mate. No dramas. I appreciate that. Tell you what I’ll do. I’ll hang up this call. I’ll call one of our existing clients, and I’ll call him a boofhead, and then he can-“

Tammy:
I think he is a bit more of a-

Robbie Turner:
I know. But I’m trying to be nice.

Tammy:
Frank term than that.

Dan:
Keeping it PG [crosstalk 00:11:15].

Robbie Turner:
“I’ll call him a will boofhead, offend him, ask him if he can jump online and say some shitty comments about us, would that make you feel better?” And the other guy was like, “All right. I got it. No dramas.”

Tammy:
It’s like you just can’t win in that side things. As soon as we decided to go hard on Facebook Lives and being exposed in that kind of thing, you’re open to trolls, and we’ve had our absolute fair share of trolls. We’ve had some fake reviews that ended up getting deleted because they’ve never worked with us.

Robbie Turner:
Tell that one story Tammy, to butt in, about there was a troll from Southeast Asia who got one of our defense family members to pay money to them. And she thought she was paying money to be on our Facebook Live.

Tammy:
So awful.

Robbie Turner:
This is only about three, six months ago.

Tammy:
So basically, on our Facebook Live, we got targeted by a bunch of bots, I guess, or just online trolls. And they had set up a payment gateway link that they posted all over our pages. And these were coming in like 50 to 100 in a minute. So, our teams could not keep up. We were using moderated words. We were trying everything that Facebook has in the backend to try and stop them.

Robbie Turner:
This is why we’re live online, doing our stream. Dan, you and I were in front of the camera.

Dan:
I was oblivious. I had no idea this was happening.

Robbie Turner:
You didn’t know it was going on, but there was a little tactical operations center in there, running our backend ops.

Tammy:
Oh, my God. So basically, this link had, if you want to continue watching, click this link, and then they went to a payment gateway and they had to pay $90 to essentially, continue watching our free content. So, this woman, absolutely heartbreaking. She got scammed. She clicked this and to be honest, it looked so dodgy. It was all in Thai symbols and everything. But anyway. She essentially clicked the link, paid her $90 to continue watching, which thanks for paying for our training.

Robbie Turner:
God knows where that money went.

Tammy:
No, she did get it back, thankfully.

Robbie Turner:
That’s good.

Tammy:
We reported it and she did get it back, but it absolutely broke my heart that she was so upset with us saying, “That was on your page. That comment was on your page. You must’ve put it there,” and just blamed us for that. And I just felt awful that someone had thought, on our page, that we had scammed them or had any way we were involved in that, because it just made me feel sick. And that someone had been scammed of their hard-earned money for one of these trolls.

Dan:
And I know that you were very active Tammy, in reaching out to her on the back channel and being like, “There’s this and there’s this, and then this is the process you need to follow so that you can obviously get that reimbursed.” But it just really reinforces of just one small thing can go wrong that has this trickle on, or these snowball effects, that it becomes even bigger and bigger, and then undoes a lot of that hard work, which then results in a catastrophic failure potentially, because the reputation gets tarnished inside such a small protective community.

Tammy:
You’re just so exposed online, as a business, as humans, we’re exposed on Facebook and online. People have the opportunity to say what they want and we’ve had our share of bullies. We’ve had our share of people want to take us down. There’s definitely that tall poppy syndrome in Australia as soon as you start to make some ripples in the world. But you push through, you get shit done.

Dan:
Get shit done. I like that.

Robbie Turner:
I’ve seen it on other prominent veterans that I follow as well, that are all fucking legends. When there’s other people that try and try and poke the bear, they just put it as hashtag, send it. For any other fucker that wants to have a go at us, hashtag, send it. We are ready, I love it. But so, it’s one of those things that I love doing actually, whereby, we took down the cloak or the curtain and did things behind a webinar. And now, we just put ourselves on Facebook Live. And certainly, when we do our weekly live Q and A’s, which is a completely separate stuff to what we’re talking about now. Take my wedding ring off. Sorry, that was me. I’ve still got it with me hun, just not on. It’s like-

Dan:
He’s going to leave that behind.

Tammy:
Lost for the 17th time.

Robbie Turner:
I feel like when we’re doing our weekly Q and A’s and certainly, when we’re doing our lives, it’s like standing at the front of the Titanic. Jack’s out there saying, “I’m the King of the world.” I’m not, I’m just the King of my own lunchbox.

Dan:
But he was doing the motions of Jack on the front of the Titanic.

Tammy:
The arms are out.

Dan:
Was it even Jack that did that?

Robbie Turner:
Yeah, it was. Trust me, I know that movie very, very well. But it’s good. It’s exhilarating and it’s out there, and having that live and real time, interactive nature with people, it’s fucking gold. I love it. It’s very unique.

Dan:
No, that’s good. So, you went down there, you spent a little bit of time with their head of marketing down there. They encouraged you to divert off into one particular stream. Was there any other gems that came out of that first trip down there?

Tammy:
Well, we also got a session with Jack, so that was really exciting. The business has obviously grown a fair bit since we joined them, and so people aren’t as lucky as we were now, to have that opportunity. We had a fantastic session with him and we were at a point, and I’m sure Dan, you’ll realize that you saw a big change in us at the time.

Robbie Turner:
Did you just get a Daniel?

Dan:
I’m in so much trouble, and I don’t even know what for.

Robbie Turner:
Fuck, that was gold.

Tammy:
I thought I said Dan. Did I say Daniel?

Robbie Turner:
That was great.

Tammy:
Oh, my God. And basically, we were talking about how challenging it was to work together and just getting in each other’s way. I’d just come back onboard as marketing and just trying to navigate working together. And he pretty much-

Robbie Turner:
I think he could actually see, this is a classic example of me jumping in. Tammy is telling something about the business. I’m trying to tell him about the business, and we’re just tripping over each other, because we both want to contribute in there.

Dan:
Like what you just did right then.

Robbie Turner:
I know. I wanted to use that as an example. And then this happened…

Tammy:
Thanks. So basically, he just laughed in our face and he’s like, “Have you read the book Rocket Fuel?” And we’re like, “No. What are you talking about?” And he basically goes, “Hold on two minutes.” And he ran out of this boardroom session and he went to his office, and he pulled out these two books and he said, “I’m giving you each a copy, so you don’t even have to share.”

Tammy:
Basically, the book was about visionary and integrator. So, relationships, and basically what that is, is a visionary is very much the big picture. Where are we going? Three picture, 10 year goals. That kind of thing. Just big picture stuff. And the integrator is very much the details on how do we get there? What are the risks? What are the resources we need? All of the bits and pieces. The minor details that make it all happen. And I guess, Robbie is very much the visionary. He’s very much big picture. Like, go, go, go, go, go.

Dan:
Million miles an hour, bull in a China shop.

Tammy:
Oh yeah.

Robbie Turner:
Yeah. I break shit at home everyday.

Tammy:
And I’m very much the integrator. So, I’m always about, what are the details? What is the risk involved? What’s going to happen?

Robbie Turner:
I thought, when I’d come up with a really good idea, she’d be like, “No. I don’t think we should do that.” I’m like, “Why the fuck are you being so negative?”

Dan:
Why aren’t you supporting me, honey?

Robbie Turner:
“Get your hand off the handbrake.” You guys thought I was going to say something else then. “Get your hand off the handbrake. Why are you slowing things down? I don’t understand.”

Tammy:
Even the podcast situation, the idea came up very early in the piece and we’d just done one of our biggest Facebook Lives. And we had more leads than we could handle. You two were absolutely working your asses off.

Dan:
So, we implemented a discovery session.

Tammy:
But then Robbie’s like, “I’ve had a great idea. I think we need to do a podcast.” Now to me, I’m thinking, okay, a podcast is to connect with our community, to bring in more leads. It’s a marketing activity, but it’s a branding activity. But I’m also like, “Well, you guys are absolutely under the pump with so many leads, that you’re working every single night. You’re working massive hours every day. We don’t have any staff yet at this point, or very few.” And I just was like, “Is he bloody crazy?”

Robbie Turner:
Needless to say, that was two years ago and we haven’t done a podcast since, but we’re here now.

Dan:
Well, it made for really, really good content as we flashed out the first four stories of how Axon actually came to be. If we’d started it two years ago, we would have just been like, “So, we started filming some videos,” and that would have been the end of it.

Robbie Turner:
Yeah. Last week. That’s actually a really good way of putting it. We got four years of stuff that’s occurred that we can now share with everybody. So…

Dan:
So, that would have been another gem. That really starts to show you the value of people that can coach you and guide you and mentor you through the way. Because I think I’ve heard the story of how Jack has used his integrator as well. And he almost did the exact same thing that he did to you guys, where it’s like light bulb moment, you don’t understand the visionary integrator relationship. And he literally gave the book across to his integrator.

Tammy:
His GM, Tim. At the time he was the GM. Basically, the same thing. So, a lot of the time with visionaries, you get a bit of whiplash because every 60 to 90 days, they’re changing direction or they’ve got new ideas or they’re excited about something else. So, the team is constantly going, “What are we doing now? What are we doing now?” So, they had their own experience with that, and Jack said the same thing. He said to Tim, “Have you read the book yet?” And he goes, “No.” He goes, “You need to go home and read this book.” So he did. And he’s like, “I get it now.”

Robbie Turner:
It’s literally the Bible of any entrepreneurship.

Tammy:
If you are starting a business with, even if it’s not your partner. If you’re starting a business with somebody else, or if you want to hire a general manager and a ops manager, someone that’s your right hand man, then I would highly recommend that book.

Robbie Turner:
And to be fair, it also applies to just life. Dan, when you and I are coaching our clients, there’s either the serving member or the civilian partner, it could be the male or the female or any combination of the two. Someone’s a visionary, as far as using property and creating wealth in their life, and the other person is not that interested and they just focus on integrator stuff. And I can never pick it. It’s not a trend, but this doesn’t just apply to business, this applies to life.

Dan:
Yeah. There’s always someone that’s talking about, “In five or 10 years from now, we’re going to do this and then this and then this,” and the other person is sitting in the background going, “So, let’s talk about this first investment property. Can you tell me what my interest rate is going to be and what my monthly repayment will be, and how much am I going to have to pay in rates and in mortgage insurance,” and all of that sort of stuff in the minute detail. It creates such a fantastic balance between two individuals, because you’ve got that purse and it creates a huge amount of friction. Don’t get me wrong. Because everyone almost feels like they’re pushing in both directions.

Tammy:
Well, they’re speaking a different language. They’re speaking a different language. And one thing that Jack said was, “It’s actually fantastic to have in a business. To have the two of you on different.” Because if you have two people that are visionaries, you have all these big ideas but nothing gets done or it’s-

Dan:
Can you imagine how your team would feel if you had two visionaries operating? Two Robbie Turner’s dragging in two different directions, because everyone gets good ideas, right? You say you get whiplash with one individual that’s a visionary. Imagine if you had two people pulling in opposite directions.

Robbie Turner:
What’s your little saying, Tam, if we hadn’t had come across that book?

Tammy:
Well, I say that we balance each other out, because if it was just Robbie’s business, then we’d probably be five years in front, but probably have five lawsuits as well. And if it was just my business, we’d probably be back where we were at year one, but we’d have an amazing employee handbook and an amazing OH and S policy, and all that procedure and policy.

Robbie Turner:
Or the mandatory briefs that [crosstalk 00:24:25]

Tammy:
He’s rolling his eyes at me now.

Dan:
I was just wondering if we’ve got an OH and S manual yet. I’m pretty sure we do have it somewhere.

Tammy:
Yeah, we do.

Dan:
There we go. I’ve signed it as well.

Tammy:
You have.

Dan:
There we go. I knew I’d done something to do with it. So that’s really good. And I suppose what you’ve demonstrated is, in a very, very short period of time, one trip down to see the team, you’ve effectively pivoted the entire business and dramatically changed both your professional and personal lives to have your own laneways. You’ve got to start to concede that that was a pretty valuable trip that you guys just had.

Robbie Turner:
Oh yeah. Phenomenal. It’s the power of coaching and the power of just, as you said to Tammy, just having that third party look into the business and just see some tweaks. When someone’s not emotionally connected to the business, they can see things that we can’t. The fault of-

Tammy:
Just having that external person just say, “Well, have you thought about this or have you tried that?” We see that all the time with even you guys coaching your clients, or their money habits or things like that, that you’re coaching them on. And one little tweak go, “Have you thought about using this particular way to save money, or use this particular way to manage your expenses?” Then they go, “I don’t know why I’m not doing it like that.”

Robbie Turner:
It’s phenomenal, isn’t it? Even their little client meetup we had in Brisbane over the weekend. Just the amount of feedback we had from people going, “I just never knew that I could just make those small little tweaks. We’ve now been doing it for a year or so. We’re so much further ahead. We feel so much better off, and we’re so happy about what our future’s going to hold. Just purely based on half an hour of coaching or little gold nuggets that someone flicked our way.”

Tammy:
I’ve loved recently as well, just some of the tweaks you guys have suggested, and we’ve had some amazing clients being able to save up for their deposit so much faster, not only by those tweaks, but also having that plan in place and having those goals. Because before, it’s like, “Well, we don’t know how much exactly we need, but we’ll just keep saving,” or “We’ll just make these small tweaks and work out when we can do it. We guess when we can get started.” But having that coaching session and having that plan in place, then people were like, “Okay. Here’s what we need to do. How fast can we get that done?”

Robbie Turner:
Yeah, totally.

Dan:
It’s just a change in mindset. Business is called Axon, so we can go ahead and to change your mindset is obviously on your way. But what you’re talking about there, Tammy, is absolutely correct. You set your goals and then you also have an accountability buddy, to make sure you’ve actually done it. So having that person, because you know that your things are going to be checked from that perspective, is an absolute game changer.

Tammy:
What’s your little line about that, Robbie? People only do what…

Robbie Turner:
People do those things well that are going to be checked by someone else.

Dan:
Absolutely. And a good mentor is always going to be on your back to make sure you do that.

Robbie Turner:
Yeah, totally.

Dan:
Well, I was going to say, so from that perspective, I think that was really one of the pivot points in the business, where we transitioned across to only predominantly working with defense members from that perspective. We started to see things go on a real trajectory going forward when we started to scale the business. And I think this is where most people, who have been following us for a while, really started to recognize that wow, things are changing at Axon. And the business was really starting to grow up over this six to 12 month period here. So…

Tammy:
Well, you guys are doing the content, and I was chasing people around the internet.

Robbie Turner:
We were very much entrenched working in one of our client’s houses, the Northern part of the Gold Coast there. So, it was us three. Then we had-

Tammy:
Some field support.

Robbie Turner:
Another couple of people would join us, and then we got to that point whereby, I think we had about eight people. The address shall remain undisclosed. Anyway, we’re not fucking telling you where it was. We had eight people working out of this house in a family run business, Mr. Gold Coast City Council. But we outgrew that business, but it was a great little platform, wasn’t it? We had our little downstairs client meeting area, family lunches, barbecues out the back in the-

Tammy:
Dan used to mow the lawn.

Robbie Turner:
In the early days, we’d have that same screen that I would be standing up in front of with my bung leg. We had the cricket on with the air-con blowing down our back. It was bloody gold, wasn’t it?

Dan:
It was-

Robbie Turner:
I couldn’t get up the stairs, that’s why.

Dan:
We had to stay downstairs because you had a busted leg. And the middle of summer in Queensland, we needed to have the air conditioning blowing straight down our backs to keep us nice and cool. At that point in time, the transition was we were really starting to grow up. We needed to move from that location. The team was getting too big to be able to operate from there. So, as we move forward and we start to think about the next episodes, I’m really looking forward to exploring now, what actually happened. How did we take that next step and start to really accelerate things going forward?

Robbie Turner:
It’s so good because another business book that anyone should read is a book by Gino Wickman called Traction. And Traction talks about-

Tammy:
Same author.

Dan:
Same author as Rocket Fuel.

Robbie Turner:
It is. Actually, and that’s the little thing I was going to say. That friction Dan, that you were talking about as I rub my hands together there on the pop mic. When you get that right, it’s that friction which causes the rocket fuel. What does rocket fuel do? Rocket fuel makes you blast off. So, when you do get it right, and I’m certainly not sitting here proporting that you and I and Tammy, and even the three of us, as the key leaders of Axon, get it right every day. We don’t. That’s the reason why there’s friction. That’s the reason why we’ve done so well. That’s the reason why there’s some blood on the floor every now and then as our conversations, because that’s the point.

Tammy:
Even though there is friction, there is always an underlying, what do you call it? But an underlying theme that it’s all for the love of Axon, the love for our team, the love for the bigger picture. So that even when there is friction, we’re all still aligned with where we’re going, what we’re doing, the bigger picture.

Robbie Turner:
You threw a meme on our little Skype chat. It’s like, a team is not a group of individuals that work together. A team is a group of individuals that trust each other. That’s massively different.

Dan:
Based on that, that is an awesome way to close out this episode. When we come back next time, we’re going to be actually talking about how we grew up, in my mind, from an Axon perspective, and where we lead to from there. And then we’ll get to start speaking to some more of the team, which is really bloody exciting.

Robbie Turner:
Things are just about starting to getting a little bit more interesting. Right. Thanks for listening everyone. Speak to you again soon. See you later

Tammy:
Bye.

Dan:
See you.

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